Course Descriptions

 

This section includes a list of the credit courses offered at the College. Not all courses are offered each term. Credit Course Schedules for the spring, summer and fall show which courses are offered during those terms. Three letters followed by three digits and two digits or letters label each course offered by the College. The three letters designate the discipline area of the course. For instance, EGL = English and MAT = mathematics. The three digits indicate the title of the course. The last two digits designate the section or delivery method of the course. Courses are listed according to subject area, which are listed alphabetically. Courses with numbers of 100 or less carry credits but may not be used to satisfy degree or certificate requirements. Their primary purpose is to prepare students for subsequent college level courses.

  • Pre-requisites are courses, certifications, assessment test scores, qualifications for enrollment in other courses, such as eligibility for EGL101, or other measurable activities which must be successfully completed prior to enrollment in the course. Pre-requisites are courses which must be completed with a grade of “C” or higher prior to enrollment in the course.
  • Co-requisites are courses that must be taken simultaneously or prior to enrollment in the specific course.

Notes:  Students are expected to read and write at a college level for all courses except the developmental courses.

English and Mathematics Requirement
It is strongly recommended that all students complete both mathematics and an English course within their first 12 credit hours. To ensure maximum success, mathematics and English courses should be taken during consecutive terms until the sequence is completed. All students must have begun their English and mathematics sequences by completion of their first 30 credit hours or registration will be blocked until the student meets with an academic advisor to see if an exemption is in order.

Activity Elective Courses
Courses that fulfill the activity elective requirement for graduation are coded “ACT” in the course description under PED.

Programming Electives

CIS 143 Excel Applications and Programming
CSC 148 Server Side Scripting w/ASP
CSC 161 Oracle Introduction to SQL
CSC 261 Oracle II - Database Programming with SQL
CSC 182 Scripting Languages
CSC 106 Introduction to Programming Logic
CSC 109 Introduction to Programming
CSC 131 Visual Basic Programming
CIS 133 Access Applications and Programming
CSC 170 JAVA
CSC 205 Computer Science I
CSC 218 Computer Science II
CSC 224 Autolisp Programming

Graphic Design Electives

ART 101 Fundamentals of Design I
ART 105 Illustration, Materials and Techniques
ART 130 Drawing I
VCP 116 Digital Imaging I
VCP 117 Digital Imaging II
VCP 118 Digital Imaging III
VCP 119 Digital Imaging IV
VCP 230 Graphic Design Studio

General Education Course Codes
The following codes are used in the course descriptions to identify elective courses that satisfy the General Education Core Requirements:

E English Composition
H Arts and Humanities
I Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues
M Mathematics
SL Science with Lab
S Science
SS Behavioral and Social Sciences

Accounting

ACC101 Accounting I introduces the concepts and practices used in financial accounting. Topics studied include the use of journals and ledgers as well as the preparation of financial statements for a single proprietorship. Additional topics studied include cash, accounts and notes receivable, merchandise inventory, depreciation, current liabilities, and guidelines. Procedures for maintaining the records for service and merchandise firms are emphasized. 3 credits

ACC102 Accounting II develops financial and managerial accounting concepts, including partnership and corporate forms of business organizations. In addition, the concepts related to generally accepted accounting principles, the conceptual framework of accounting, and the objectives of financial reporting, long term liabilities, investments, international operations, the statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, introductory management accounting, manufacturing accounting, and job order and process accounting are studied. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC101.

ACC103 Accounting with Quickbooks  teaches concepts and techniques for recording various business transactions including sales, receivables, payables, and payroll. Various accounting reports and end of period accounting procedures for both a service and merchandising business will be included. Procedures for converting a manual accounting system to a computerized system are covered. Practice sets and comprehenisve problems are part of the assignments. Only data information needed to complete assignments is provided on a CD. The QuickBooks software is not provided to the student. Transcript available. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: ACC101, CIS101.

ACC104 Managerial Accounting prepares individuals involved in managerial positions to make the correct accounting decisions. This course involves detailed instruction budgets, control systems, cost allocation, job costing systems, process costing systems, overhead application of costs, and variable and absorption costing. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC101.

ACC105 Accounting with Peachtree Software teaches the concepts of the comprehensive, computerized accounting software program Peachtree. Students will learn to apply accounting concepts to the computerized records of a sole proprietorship. In addition, students will learn to maintain complete payroll records for a small business. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BUS101, CIS101.

ACC201 Accounting III is designed to provide the student with a thorough knowledge of the components of financial statements. Using FASB pronouncements and guidelines, the complex relationship between reporting methods and statements is examined. Other topics studied include asset valuations, revenue recognition, inventory valuation, acquisition and disposal of property, plant and equipment, depreciation and depletion, intangibles, and current liabilities and contingencies. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC102.

ACC202 Accounting IV covers investments in concurrent operating assets-utilization and retirement, and in debt and equity securities, leases, income taxes, and employee compensation, including payroll, pensions, and other compensation, issues, derivatives, contingencies, business segments and interim reports, earnings per share, accounting changes and error corrections, and analysis of financial statements. Microsoft Excel is used to solve a number of assigned problems, including a continuing comprehensive problem. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC102 or ACC201.

ACC203 Tax Accounting is an in-depth study of the procedures for filing federal income tax forms at the personal level. Topics include forms, schedules, and statements that support the return. In addition to theory lectures, students are given an opportunity to apply the concepts and principles through preparation of simulated tax returns. Students are also given an opportunity to prepare individual returns using a tax software package. Related state income tax concepts are studied. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC101.

ACC204 Payroll Accounting is a basic course in computerized payroll fundamentals, including computing and paying wages and salaries as well as analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions. In addition, the legal aspects of social security, income tax withholding, and unemployment compensation taxes will be covered. The course includes the completion of a payroll project. 3 credits

ACC205 Business Spreadsheet Applications students perform accounting data analysis using Microsoft Excel spreadsheeting. Templates provided in the software package are used in some of the applications while students will need to prepare their own templates for other applications. Applications include, but are not limited to, comparative financial statements, comparing of ratios and other analytical data, preparation of budgets and miscellaneous spreadsheeting applications. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ACC101.

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Anthropology

ANT101 Cultural Anthropology (SS) is an introduction to the basic concepts involved in analyzing human experience in religion, kinship, and political systems, as well as mating, marriage, and other cultural characteristics. Anthropological methods which relate to the study of small-scale and large-scale societies will be examined and discussed. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

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Art

ART101 Fundamentals of Design I (H) is an introductory study of composition and principles of two-dimensional design. Projects deal with the organization of the graphic elements (line, shape, value, texture, color and space) into effective, unified designs, whether in fine or commercial arts, photography or everyday life. An introduction to color theory is included. This course is valuable for persons anticipating a career in art, photography, media technology, or education. 3 credits

ART105 Illustration, Materials and Techniques is a studio course which introduces students to a variety of materials and techniques appropriate for use in the field of illustration. Topics may include charcoal, graphite pencil, color pencil, pastel, inks, markers, scratchboard, various paints, printmaking techniques, collage, and airbrush. Previous experience in drawing is recommended before enrolling for this course. 3 credits

ART110 Color (H) is a studio course which serves as an introduction to the varied relationships and qualities of color in regard to the visual world. Assignments explore both physical and psychological aspects of color theory. This course is valuable for anyone interested in the fine/commercial arts, or in understanding how color can affect our behavior and observations. 3 credits

ART130 Drawing I (H) introduces students to basic drawing concepts, techniques, materials, and the development of observational skills. The course focuses on descriptive value, composition, visual and spatial relationships, linear and aerial perspective, volumetric forms, subject and content using a variety of black and white media. The course includes vocabulary development, critical analysis activities, and reference to historic and contemporary models of drawing. Emphasis is on observational drawing. 3 credits

ART140 Painting I (H) introduces students to various approaches to painting in oils in the studio. It is intended for the beginning painter with little or no background in painting. Technical skills are developed through demonstrations, structured assignments, lectures, and critiques. 3 credits

ART141 Survey of Art History (H) is a survey course which explores art forms and aesthetic intentions from prehistory to the present. The course of study parallels the development of Western Civilization and emphasizes the relationship of art forms to that development. Major emphasis is on painting, sculpture, and architecture. The course may include museum trips. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

ART150 Art Appreciation and Museum Studies (H) is a discussion/lecture course with travel to museums, galleries, and/or artists’ studios to view works of art. Topics may include historical context of artworks, specific artists, styles and movements, personal, historical or societal influences on artists, subject and content, aesthetic intent, formal organization, materials, and methods. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

ART152 Sculpture (H) introduces students to the basic materials and techniques used in creating sculptural forms. Emphasis is on the development of form recognition and comprehension in the third dimension. Basic shapes encountered in daily activities are used as the building blocks in the development and construction of more complex sculptural forms. Starting with projects using both additive and subtractive methods, the basic human structure will be explored. Projects using both realistic and free-form concepts will be considered.
3 credits

ART160 Beginning Ceramics (H) introduces the student to processes, tools, and aesthetics of ceramic forms, both functional and sculptural. Students explore various hand-building, wheel-throwing, decorating, glazing, and firing techniques. Studio performance concerning technical, aesthetic, and skill development is stressed.
3 credits

ART161 Ceramics/Japanese Raku is a short course which introduces students to contemporary approaches and the historical background of raku. Students will learn basic techniques used to construct, glaze, and fire raku pottery. Previous experience in clay is recommended. 1 credit

ART162 Ceramic/Color Clay is a studio course which introduces the student to a wide potential for the use of color clay bodies. The course will cover the creation of various color clay bodies, forming techniques, and its use in jewelry, sculpture, and functional ware. 1 credit

ART163 Ceramics/Masks and Self-Portraits is a studio course on the design and creation of clay masks and self-portraits. The course explores the development of the mask in relationship to its historical use in rituals and ceremonies of various cultures. The course also focuses on the creation of the self-portrait as a symbolic and psychological statement. 1 credit

ART164 Ceramics/Small Sculpture is a studio course designed to expose students to a variety of techniques for creating small sculpture from clay. Along with the technical aspects of working with clay, firing and non-firing methods of completing the sculptures are discussed. 1 credit

ART165 Ceramics/Polymer Clay Jewelry is a studio course dealing with the newest form of clay. Polymer clay, which is hardened in a simple toaster oven, is best known under the trademark names of Sculpty and Fimo. Emphasis is on learning basic jewelry-making techniques such as caning, marbelizing, millefiori, surface design texturing, and bead formation. Sculpture applications will also be discussed. 1 credit

ART166 Ceramics/Egyptian Paste is a studio course dealing with the self-glazing Egyptian paste clay body, best known by the scarabs and small turquoise sculpture of ancient Egypt. The course covers the preparation of clay bodies and various forming techniques, such as press molding and hand building that are most appropriate to the material. The course also covers the development of personal symbols and images to be used in designs. 1 credit

ART167 Ceramics/Japanese Raku is a studio course dealing with the technique of raku. It will explore contemporary approaches to the art of raku, as well as the historical relationship to the Japanese ritual tea ceremony and the philosophy of Zen. Technical aspects of the class deal with clay and glaze formulation, construction techniques, kiln building, glazing, and use of oxidation and reduction firing. 3 credits

ART179 Surface Design for Ceramics explores a variety of surface techniques for ceramics.  The elements and principles of design will be discussed and utilized to create surface designs for ceramic forms.  Students will explore techniques to manipulate form and surface throughout the stages of the ceramic process.  This course includes techniques for greenware and bisqueware as well as post-firing techniques.  Students will mix glazes and experiment with materials for low and mid-fire temperatures. The relationship between form and surface will be emphasized. 3 credits

ART180 Basic Photography (H) introduces students to the fundamental aesthetics and techniques of photography, to the practice of creative thinking, and to communication through visual imagery. Digital cameras and digital imaging work stations are available for student use in class. 3 credits

ART181 Introduction To Movie Making (H) is an introduction to the theory and practice of movie making with electronic video technology. Topics include creative concept development, production planning, capturing, and editing for artistic expression. Students work in a hands-on environment to develop and produce short movies. 3 credits

ART182 Sculpture II is a continuation of ART152 Sculpture I, which explores various materials and techniques used in creating sculpture. Emphasis is placed on the further development of technical skills, aesthetic understanding, solutions to sculptural problems, and a personal approach to sculpture. Students will explore their ideas from the initial sketch, through model development, to project completion. This course will integrate techniques learned in other art disciplines. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART152.

ART183 Digital Illustration I teaches traditional illustration methods combined with computer illustration techniques to enable students to learn contemporary professional illustration practices. Emphasis is placed on creative concept development, composition, design, research, workflow, drawing techniques for hand and computer, and portfolio production. Topics include fine art illustration, still life illustration, product illustration, book illustration, and editorial illustration. Previous drawing experience is preferred. 4 credits

ART194 Wheel-Thrown Ceramics (H) introduces students to the pottery wheel with emphasis on the skill development of throwing techniques. The course will focus on the development of personal style, perfection of thrown forms and craftsmanship. A wide range of pottery forms and surface treatments will be studied and applied to the work made. Students will be given a foundation in the history, aesthetic, and technical aspects of working with clay on the potter’s wheel. Students will explore the pottery wheel as a tool for construction in conjunction with other building techniques. 3 credits

ART195 Integrated Arts Integrated Arts introduces students to the areas of visual arts, music, theatre, and dance through an exploration of representative works. Consideration is given to the historic ethnic and contemporary social influences of the arts. This experience will enhance self-expression and foster a better understanding of the human experience. This course meets the integrated arts requirement of the Maryland state approved Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree. 3 credits

ART196 Wheel-Thrown Ceramics II expands on the skills introduced in Wheel-Thrown Ceramics. Emphasis is placed on advanced techniques for throwing and decorating surfaces. The course encourages developing a personal style as well as refining craftsmanship and thrown forms. Students will utilize the pottery wheel as a tool for construction in conjunction with other building techniques. Students are expected to explore the creative potential of the medium in relationship to concepts, aesthetics and function. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART194.

ART201 Three-Dimensional Design (H) is a studio course that introduces students to various aspects of three-dimensional design. Students deal with the application of design concepts to three-dimensional problems. Individual creative approaches to materials and techniques are encouraged. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART101.

ART230 Drawing II (H) builds on Drawing I by concentrating on long-term assignments in the studio. It is intended for those students with previous experience in drawing. Emphasis is on experimentation with materials and individual expression. Students will study approaches taken by various artists to develop a series of related works. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART130.

ART231 Portrait Drawing is an introductory class exploring basic mechanical and expressive components of portraiture. Emphasis is on solid structure and disciplined characterization. Instruction deals with form and structure in the first half of the course, and expression and characterization in the second half. Previous drawing experience is highly recommended before enrolling in this course. 3 credits

ART 232 Figure Drawing is an introductory course in drawing the human figure. The first half of the course emphasizes accuracy in proportion and achieving solid form and structure; the second half deals with characterization. Projects will deal with the form and structure of the body, as well as subjective aspects of the pose. Previous drawing experience is highly recommended before enrolling in this course. 3 credits

ART240 Painting II (H) is a studio course concerned with the further development of compositional organization, technical skills, and color usage. Emphasis is on individualized approaches to painting and personal exploration with reference to past and contemporary artists. Students are encouraged to experiment with combinations of media and techniques for exploration in representational, abstract, and non-objective work. This course is intended for the student with previous painting experience. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART140.

ART242 Survey of Modern Art History (H) is a survey course which explores 19th and 20th century art and aesthetic intentions, as well as their roots in the late 18th century. The arts are viewed in relationship to social and economic context, painting, and two-dimensional arts; however, sculpture, architecture, and crafts are also discussed. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

ART260 Intermediate Ceramics (H) examines personal approaches to clay building and decorating. Major emphasis is on development of personal style, areas of special interest, perfection of forms and craftsmanship. The student is expected to become aware of the creative potential of the medium in relationship to function and aesthetics. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART160.

ART261 Advanced Ceramics expands the student's exploration or personal style and aesthetic application through an examination of historical and cultural references. Experimentation with form development, surface decoration and personal symbolism is emphasized. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ART260.

ART291 Portfolio Production I provides an opportunity for advanced art students to concentrate on building portfolios in individual areas of interest to further their educational, career and personal goals. Students will create a focused body of artwork to produce a portfolio. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

ART292 Portfolio Production II provides an opportunity for advanced art students to concentrate on building an in-depth portfolio in individual areas of interest to further their educational, career and personal goals. Students will create a focused body of artwork to produce a portfolio. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

ART293 Professional Portfolio Production enables art majors who have completed 18 credit hours of art courses to concentrate on creating a Capstone Portfolio of artwork, images, and written documentation to prepare for application to a transfer institution and/or for personal or career goals. With guidance from an instructor, students create a cohesive body of work to produce a professional portfolio and a capstone art exhibit that is presented to the community. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

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Assessment of Prior Learning

APL270 Assessment of Prior Learning: Portfolio Construction provides the opportunity for the student to develop a portfolio for prior learning to be assessed for college credit. The student will be shown how to articulate, evaluate, and document this learning, organize it into courses, establish interconnections between theory and practice, and present it for evaluation by faculty experts. 1 credit
Pre-requisite and Co-requisite: Documented employment in career area for which assessment is being done and overall GPA of at least 2.0.

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Astronomy

AST103 Principles of Astronomy (SL) provides the basic concepts of the astronomical study of the universe and involves the development of astronomical ideas from ancient times to the present. The course emphasizes the relationship of Earth to the universe. The scientific principles needed to understand the concepts in astronomy are presented and include Newton's laws of motion and universal gravitation, the nature of light, spectroscopy, atomic structure, special relativity, thermonuclear reactions, and general relativity. Topics include the solar system, the sun and other stars, galaxies, and modern ideas in cosmology. Appropriate laboratory exercises and at-home activities are integrated into the course. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

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Biology/Biotechnology

BIO101 General Biology (S) introduces the student to the basic biological principles common to all living things, with emphasis on evolution, molecular biology, diversity, ecology, physiology and genetics. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT092.
Co-requisites: BIO111, EGL101.

BIO103 Introduction to Zoology (S) will study the animal kingdom, methods of classification, evolution, genetics, comparative anatomy, physiology and behavior of various animal groups. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT093.
Co-requisites: EGL101, BIO113.

BIO104 Botany: Introduction to Horticulture (S) will study the structure, function, reproduction and propagation of plants. Topics will include anatomy, classification, physiological processes and requirements for life. The course will include studies designed to understand currently relevant topics such as biodiversity, the health of the Chesapeake Bay vegetation, and biotechnology. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT092.
Co-requisites: BIO114, EGL101.

BIO111 General Biology Lab is a laboratory course designed to actively involve the student in the process of science. The student will perform experimental activities that include using technology, and collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting data. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO101.

BIO113 Introduction to Zoology Lab will reinforce and expand on topics covered in the co-requisite course of Introduction to Zoology. This course will include laboratory and field work, including dissections and observations of animal behavior. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO103.

BIO114 Botany: Introduction to Horticulture Lab provides a hands-on and field experience to complement the studies of Botany: Introduction to Horticulture. The emphasis will be on the anatomy and identification of plants and familiarity with their growth habits, accompanied by exposure to native plants and invasive species. Weather permitting, educational walks and tours of native plant arboretums, greenhouses and botanical gardens will be undertaken. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO104.

BIO123 Foundations of Nutrition (S) introduces the non-science major to the basic nutritional principles used to prepare a sound diet and live a healthy nutrition lifestyle. Particular emphasis is placed on: food origins/ethnic foods, general food groups, fuel nutrients, diet analysis and energy expenditure, food safety, societal and fad eating trends and their relationship to health. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in EGL093 and MAT093.

BIO130 Principles of Biology I (S) is the first semester of a two semester general biology sequence designed for students majoring in areas of science or health science. Basic principles of biology will be studied with emphasis on cellular and molecular biology. 3 credits
Co-requisites: BIO131, EGL101, MAT121.

BIO131 Principles of Biology I Lab is the first semester of a two-semester general biology laboratory sequence designed for students majoring in areas of science or health science. Students will develop and perform experiments involving molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, and cell biology. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO130.

BIO132 Principles of Biology II (S) is the second semester of a two-semester general biology sequence designed for students majoring in areas of science or health science. Basic principles of biology will be studied with emphasis on evolution, classification of life forms and their environments, ethology, and ecology of populations and communities. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO130, BIO131.
Co-requisite: BIO133.

BIO133 Principles of Biology II Lab is the second semester of a two-semester general biology laboratory sequence designed for students majoring in areas of science or health science. Students will perform experimental activities in the lab and field that include the study of evolution, organismal diversity and their environments, ethology, and ecology of populations and communities. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO132.

BIO200 Microbiology (S) surveys the roles of microorganisms in today’s environment. We examine the history and development of microbiology, survey the diversity of microbes, and compare the structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Metabolic processes such as fermentation, photosynthesis, aerobic and anaerobic respiration are studied. Beneficial microbes and epidemiology are discussed. We will examine the growing role of microbes, through bioengineering and immunology, in maintaining our environmental and personal health. 3 credits
Co-requisite: BIO210.

BIO203 Nutrition studies the principles of nutrition and their application in both health and disease and throughout the life cycle. The course is intended primarily for students going into nursing or related fields.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: BIO101 or BIO130.

BIO206 Introduction to Biotechnology will provide the student with a survey of biotechnology applications in plant and animal sciences, industrial and medical fields, and forensics. The legal, ethical and biological ramifications of these applications will be discussed. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO101 and BIO111 or BIO130 and BIO131.

BIO208 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (S) studies the structural and functional organization of the human organism with initial emphasis on the concepts of homeostasis and levels of organization. This is followed by a brief survey of histology and then the study of four organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT093.
Co-requisites: BIO218.

BIO209 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (S) completes the sequence of study of the human body by studying the following organ systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Relevant topics of metabolism, electrolytes balance, and human genetics and development are included. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218, MAT093.
Co-requisite: BIO219.

BIO210 Microbiology Lab introduces the student to methods for studying microbes including various types of microscopy, staining techniques, transformation and culture methods. Students will participate in lab experiments that stress the importance of microbe diversity, their unique physical and chemical growth requirements, and appropriate identification processes. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO200.

BIO216 Introduction to BiotechnologyLab allows students to use the techniques discussed in BIO lecture. Students will have hands-on experience with the equipment and procedures currently in use in biotechnology such as immunological testing, bioengineered organisms, proteomics, and informatics. This course prepares students with the skills to perform in an industrial setting as well as a higher level biology laboratory. 1 credit
Co-requisite: BIO206.

BIO218 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab reinforces the topics covered in the lecture course BIO 208 with hands-on activities.  Students will use models, wall charts, microscopes, dissections and experimental observations. Students will study basic histology as well as the structure and function of the skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. It is strongly recommended that students take an introductory Biology course before enrolling in an Anatomy and Physiology course. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: MAT093.
Co-requisite: BIO101 and BIO111 or BIO130 and BIO133, BIO 208.

BIO219 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab uses models, microscopes, dissections and experimental observations to reinforce topics in the endocrine, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: BIO218.
Co-requisite: BIO209.

BIO222 Genetics encompasses transmission genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, genomics, and proteomics with a focus on understanding concepts and their applications. This course should be of interest to students pursuing careers in advanced studies in biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, science teaching, and health sciences. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: BIO130 or BIO101.
Co-requisite: BIO232.

BIO226 Biotechnology II With Lab investigates components of biomanufacturing, such as upstream and downstream processing, protein structure, and laboratory regulations. This laboratory-oriented course is designed to give students hands-on skills and techniques utilized in the biotechnology field, including scaling up cell cultures and protein expression, purification and characterization. This course is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in biotech and pharmaceutical companies or transfers to four year institutions. 5 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO206, BIO216.

BIO232 Genetics Lab uses an experimental approach to illustrate and explain the basic concepts of genetics, including recombinant DNA techniques and classical, molecular, and population genetics. Students will have hands-on experience with DNA analysis, PCR, Western blots, protein analysis, and simulations to reinforce the topics covered in the lecture. This course will prepare students to employ the techniques used in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: BIO101 and BIO111 or BIO130 and BIO131.
Co-requisite: BIO222.

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Business

BUS103 Introduction to Business Introduction to Business provides an overview of the major functional areas of business and our economic systems. Organizational areas include business systems, management, human resources, marketing, production, and operations and information. Blended throughout the course are business-world trends of the growth of international business, the significance of small business, the continuing growth of the service sector, the need to manage information and communication technology, and the role of ethics and social responsibility. 3 credits

BUS108 Principles of Purchasing examines the purchasing process including inventory control, price determination, vendor selection, negotiation techniques, and ethical issues. This course will also provide an overview of the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, which covers simplified acquisition procedures (SAP). 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

BUS111 Business Communications develops the written and oral communication skills needed in the world of business. The course emphasizes process writing in the preparation of business letters, memos, employment documents, and a business report and/or proposal. Mechanics, form, style, and content of the various forms of business correspondence are emphasized. Intercultural aspects of communication, analysis of audience, and the use of bias-free language are explored. Reviews of grammar, usage, punctuation, and suggestions for document design are included. The course includes the preparation and delivery of an oral presentation on a business topic. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

BUS131 Principles of Management introduces the various principles and theories associated with management. Ethical and practical considerations are integrated through the use of lectures and the studying of management cases. 3 credits

BUS175 Administrative Office Procedures introduces students to common administrative procedures used in the office. Procedures are identified, and the student is given an opportunity to practice the skills needed to administer the procedures. Students will learn appropriate job-seeking strategies as well. Procedures include those for maintaining records, using electronic office equipment, making travel arrangements, practicing good business etiquette, managing time, maintaining financial records, and communicating effectively. 3 credits

BUS187 Business Ethics focuses on ethics in the workplace. Applications, as well as past and current case studies, center on justice and governmental systems, corporations, information technology, workers’ rights and related issues, discrimination and affirmative action, business professions, the international business system, international business, cultural diversity, and international obligations. Actual court cases involving ethical issues are studied. An overall view of moral philosophies, including approaches to ethical theory, such as utilitarianism, deontological approaches, and the philosophies of Kant, Rawls, and others, are studied, discussed and applied. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

BUS191 Introduction to Finance addresses fundamental concepts in financial management such as security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, valuation models and related global issues. This course explains how financial managers help maximize the value of a firm by making capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure decisions. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT093.

BUS207 Introduction to Public Relations introduces the student to the study of public relations, a distinctive management function which helps establish and maintain mutual lines of communication between an organization and its public. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

BUS210 Business Law covers topics including the sources of law, the regulatory environment, and the growing legal considerations involved with commercial activity. Emphasis is placed on contract law, personal property law, sales, and the use of the uniform commercial code. Case analysis and outside reading assignments are also used throughout the course. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

BUS212 Principles of Marketing emphasizes the growing field of marketing. Topics studied include product service planning, marketing information management, purchasing, pricing, promotion, selling, risk management, finance, and distribution. Applicable ethics to this field are studied and discussed. In addition to the class lectures, videos and films are used to emphasize the principles. Students participate in case analysis and various marketing projects. Familiarity with computer applications, including Internet operations and some word processing, is essential for success in this course. 3 credits

BUS216 Organizational Leadership is a study of the characteristics and traits constituting effective leadership and its impact on organizations. Students will review the history of leadership, the various theories of leadership, and topics on organizational behavior, personality, and attitudes related to work. Additional topics studied include work motivation, interpersonal communication, use of teams and groups in organizations, and group dynamics. Also included is a review and discussion of past and current writings of various leaders.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: BUS131.

BUS219 Integrated Document Applications emphasizes the preparation and production of complex document formatting techniques using software to do the word processing on a personal computer. Emphasis is placed on student proficiency in preparing and producing letters, memoranda, and reports. This course also reviews and develops language skills by emphasizing the study of grammar usage, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, and proofreading of business communications. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS111.

BUS225 Customer Relations provides students with the opportunity to explore and develop current management concepts that will enable them to be effective in communication, motivation, and dealing with employee conflict. Students will participate in a wide range of activities, including role playing, case analysis, and various management projects that reinforce the concepts presented. If students are required to achieve results with and through other people, this course will provide the needed concepts and practices. 3 credits

BUS231 Management of Human Resources addresses the concepts fundamental to current management practices through management problem solving situations, projects, and case studies. Topics include equal employment opportunity, job requirements, human resources planning and recruitment, selection of personnel, career development, appraising and improving performance, compensation, incentives and employee benefits, safety and health concerns, labor relations and collective bargaining, and creating high performance work systems. 3 credits

BUS234 Team Building Experiential Learning will guide students through an applied learning experience that helps them improve the direction, motivation, and goal achievement of a work-team. This practicum will provide learners with the skills needed to develop and guide a high-performing team which achieves organizational objectives, as this skill-set is an increasingly important learning experience in today's global environment. The team leader will learn to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the team in relation to organizational goals. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.
Co-requisite: BUS103.

BUS235 Applied Technology Experiential Learning focuses on analyzing, designing, implementing, and evaluating data through the use of technology. The scope of the experiential learning course includes a review of the fundamentals of computer applications and the development of reports, charts, and graphs applicable to the student's work environment. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, BUS103.
Co-requisite: CIS101.

BUS236 Finance Experiential Learning will guide students in applying financial management concepts in the workplace. Learners will gain skills needed to develop financial management strategies in today's global environment. Students will gain knowledge and experience in building a basic departmental budget. Students will analyze the strengths and weaknesses of financial management strategies in relation to organizational goals. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, BUS131.
Co-requisite: BUS191.

BUS237 International Finance Experiential Learning will guide students through an applied learning experience within the workplace to understand the basics of international trade and finance and the effects of various international economic policies on domestic and global welfare. The course will highlight sources of comparative advantage, gains, and losses from trade, the impact of trade on economic growth, and effects of trade policy interventions. Students will evaluate decisions, policies, and behaviors from an international perspective. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, BUS103.
Co-requisite: ECO222.

BUS238 Human Resources Experiential Learning explores the human resource management functions in organizational and corporate settings. Students will focus on the development of knowledge and skills of basic concepts, employment laws, and strategic approaches to human resource management. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.
Co-requisite: BUS231.

BUS239 Process Improvement Experiential Learning focuses on the principles and practices of process improvement with special emphasis on Six Sigma and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis. Attention is given to the leadership challenges of initiation, collaboration, design, implementation, and portfolio project management of process-centric improvements within and across organizations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.
Co-requisite: BUS187.

BUS240 Strategic Planning Experiential Learning focuses on the processes involved in the development and implementation of a strategic plan. Topics include the variety of perspectives, models, and approaches used in strategic planning. Topics related to the planning process include organizational leadership, organizational culture, organizational environment, size of the organization, and expertise of planners. Students must complete 75% of their degree coursework prior to enrolling in this course. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BUS103, MAT127.

BUS242 Advertising examines the fundamentals of advertising as it relates to marketing promotions. This course addresses planning, creating, executing, and monitoring integrated advertising campaigns. Specific topics include print media, broadcast media, copywriting, and international advertising. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: BUS212.

BUS243 Personal Selling is an integral part of the promotional mix. In today’s highly competitive market, an effective sales approach which focuses on defining customer’s needs, explaining product value, and ultimately having the customer’s joint agreement in said value is essential to a successful business. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: BUS212.

BUS244 Organizational Behavior will provide the student the opportunity to explore and develop the basic principles of human behavior that effective managers use when managing individuals and groups in organizations. Topics include various aspects of behavioral concepts and practices that impact an organization. 3 credits

BUS 273 College-Based Work Experience provides the opportunity for a student to obtain work experience that is productive in nature and an essential part of the overall educative process.  The work assignment is related to the student’s field of study and/or career interests.  The work assignment serves as an extended laboratory and training station supervised by a faculty member from the field of study and an on-site representative of the employer, and coordinated by the CBWEB coordinator.  3 credits.
Pre-requisite:  GPA of 2.0 and completion of all relevant courses as listed in the program option. 

BUS289 Business Practicum designed as the capstone (core) course to be taken in the last semester of a student's program of study. Students will examine best practices in business using materials that reflect broad themes which make up the spectrum of issues that define business today. In addition, students will examine management checklists and action lists that offer practical solutions for everyday business problems, and will summarize influential business books. Students who do not have a current business-related position will be required to complete college-based work study hours. A written presentation and a team oral presentation will be required at the completion of the course. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Student must complete 45 credits or 75 percent of their program before taking this course.

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Chemistry

CHM103 General Chemistry I (S) studies the fundamental principles of chemistry including measurement, atomic structure, stoichiometry, energy relationships, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and gases.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT093.
Co-requisite: CHM113.

CHM104 General Chemistry II (S) is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics include solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, equilibria in aqueous solution, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: CHM103, CHM113.
Co-requisites: CHM114, MAT121.

CHM109 Chemistry and Art (SL) studies the application of chemical principles to various aspects of the visual arts. Topics include elements, compounds, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, and polymers. These concepts are introduced where appropriate in the exploration of the chemistry of art media such as paints, dyes, metals, glass, ceramics, plastics, paper, fibers, and photographic materials. Laboratory activities have been designed to complement and enhance the lecture topics. The instructional approach used in this course is a combination of lecture, demonstrations, small group work, experiential exercises, and discussion. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT092.

CHM113 General Chemistry I Lab will expose students to proper chemistry laboratory procedures and demonstrate certain principles of chemistry, including accurate measurement and data collection, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, energy relationships via calorimetry, quantitative analysis via spectrophotometry, and the nature of gases. 1 credit
Co-requisites: CHM103, CHM114.

CHM114 General Chemistry II Lab extends students’ exposure to proper laboratory procedures related to the following areas: qualitative analysis, chemical reactions in aqueous solution, acid-base titration, rate studies, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction titration, and chemical synthesis. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: CHM103, CHM113.
Co-requisite: CHM104.

CHM203 Organic Chemistry I with Lab studies the structure, properties, major reactions, and nomenclature of organic compounds. Also included in the course are stereochemistry and spectroscopic methods of analysis. Major classes of organic compounds discussed are aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, aromatic hydrocarbons, and alcohols. The laboratory portion of the course includes essential organic chemistry laboratory techniques and experiments designed to reinforce concepts discussed in lecture. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: CHM106.

CHM204 Organic Chemistry II with Lab is the continuation of CHM 203. Topics include organometallic compounds, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, condensation reactions, amines, aryl halides, and phenols. Special topics include carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. The laboratory portion is designed to reinforce concepts discussed in lecture and to teach organic chemistry laboratory techniques.
4 credits
Pre-requisite: CHM203.

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Chinese

CHI101 Elementary Chinese I is an introductory course in Mandarin Chinese for students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. Students will learn to write Chinese characters and use essential vocabulary and elementary grammar for oral and written communication. Students will also explore aspects of Chinese culture and society. 4 credits

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College Success

COL081 College Success Seminar I is an entry-level course that presents study skills for courses in all disciplines. Course content from various disciplines, guest lecturers, and orientation assignments combine to provide each student with learning strategies to build student success. Assignments require students to apply academic strategies to other courses. 1 credit

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Computer Information Systems

CIS101 Introduction to Computer Concept (I) is an introduction to the field of data processing. This non-technical course uses personal computers in classroom and laboratory environments to introduce the concepts of spreadsheets, databasing, and word processing. Emphasis is placed on computer theory. (Students with limited keyboarding skills are advised to take CIS 105 Keyboarding before or concurrently with CIS101). 3 credits

CIS105 Keyboarding is the foundation skill required for effective computer usage in virtually every profession. The keyboard is now a tool used extensively by educators, managers, scientists, engineers, attorneys, physicians, factory workers, and employees in a vast array of positions. This course is designed to help you achieve the goal of using proper techniques and meaningful practice to key accurately and rapidly. 1 credit

CIS111 Microsoft Applications reviews the basics of Microsoft Office Professional and continues to cover advanced functions of word processing, spreadsheeting, databasing, presentation software, and data sharing and integration. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS101.

CIS143 Excel Applications and Programming presents the study and application of spreadsheet design using the current version of the Microsoft Excel Program. Functions and applications studied will include designing, formatting, and revising spreadsheets, use of mathematical functions, copying, importing, and exporting data, use of charts and graphics, data interchange, file operations, advanced functions, macros and programming applications. Assignments are primarily related to business applications. This course may be used as a programming elective. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS101 or consent of instructor.

CIS151 Introduction to Windows Server is designed to prepare students for Microsoft Windows Server networking technology certification 70-290 MCSE exam, Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server Environment. Students will receive extensive hands-on projects, exercises, and review questions which are designed to reinforce Microsoft Windows Server certification skills. Case projects will allow students to take on the role of a Windows Network administrator; making decisions and troubleshooting real-situation problems. 3 credits
Co-requisite: DAP140.

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Counseling

COU101 Career Development is designed to provide assistance to the student in making appropriate career selections. Students will engage in an assessment of personal interests, values and skills. Students will also focus on goal setting, job hunting techniques, and the world of work and workplace issues. 3 credits

COU102 Dynamics of Human Interaction (SS) utilizes a group counseling approach to the study of personal growth and healthy personality. Needs of the group determine the topics to be emphasized from among the following: influence of self-concept and self-esteem upon college achievement, self-disclosure as a means of building friendships, coping with stress and anxiety, patterns of sexual behavior, ideas for improving marriage relationships, and development of the ability to relate to other individuals in productive and meaningful ways. This course provides an opportunity to increase interpersonal effectiveness via lectures, discussions, and direct student involvement in an on-going group experience. 3 credits

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Computer Science

CSC103 Operating Systems provides an introduction to operating system basics with the intent of giving students a deeper understanding of various operating systems. Operating systems covered include various Windows OS desktop operating systems, Windows Server OS, UNIX/Linux, and Mac OS operating systems. Students will be exposed to networking basics and information involving how to create mixed environments. 3 credits

CSC104 Computer Science Fundamentals (I) is specifically designed as an introductory course for computer, engineering, math and science students to prepare them for the digital world. Readings, research, and activities in this course are designed to help students develop a framework for technology concepts that are applicable to academic research, career preparation, and today’s digital lifestyle in these specific fields.
3 credits

CSC106 Introduction to Programming Logic is designed for the beginning student in data processing. It is designed to build skills in learning structured programming techniques with programming logic. The emphasis of the course is NOT to teach any specific programming language but to develop a student's ability to solve problems by analyzing a problem, developing an algorithm, writing a pseudo code, and developing the structured flowchart and program logic. 3 credits

CSC109 Introduction to Programming covers the core concepts and techniques of Programming using C++ and Visual Basic that are needed to logically plan and develop programs using object oriented programming and design. 3 credits

CSC110 Ethics in Information Technology Ethics in Information Technology explores the ethical dilemmas that exist where human beings, information objects, and information systems interact. The course introduces students to a variety of ethical situations from historical and cross-cultural perspectives and then explores the relevance to a variety of new and emerging technologies that are inherently social in their construction and use. 3 credits

CSC111 Introduction to CADD will enable students to create a basic 2D drawing in AutoCAD. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to create and edit a simple AutoCAD drawing. This course will help the student understand the AutoCAD user interface and workspace, use basic drawing, editing, and viewing tools, organize a drawing using layers, understand and insert blocks (symbols), prepare a layout to be plotted, and add text, hatching, and dimensions. 3 credits

CSC112 Intermediate CADD teaches students how to access and use the powerful new tools available in AutoCAD's current release . This course introduces students to the concept of 3D drawing and its ability to manipulate the objects in 3D space. Menu/Macro creation and AutoCAD customization techniques are also covered in this course. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP111 or CSC111.

CSC114 CADDware Systems will provide the student with working knowledge of third party products designed to work with or within AutoCAD and will survey other popular CAD systems currently used in industry. The course will also focus on system management and file management issues. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP112 or CSC112.

CSC130 Introduction to Linux prepares students to take and to pass the Linux+ certification exam. The course provides comprehensive coverage of topics related to Linux + certification, including Linux + distributions, installation, administration, X-Windows, networking, and security. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CIS102 or DAP140 or CSC102 or CSC140.

CSC131 Visual Basic Programming will further explore the event-driven Visual Basic language using the .Net Environment and object-oriented programming techniques. It will examine the advanced concepts of single and two-dimensional arrays, sequential files utilizing the System IO classes, additional controls and objects, database management, and object-oriented programming. Emphasis will be placed on developing object-oriented programs utilizing classes and objects and the concepts of inheritance, polymorphism, overriding, and encapsulation. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP109 or CSC109.

CSC132 Database Management is an introduction to basic data base concepts using the standard in the personal computer industry, dBASE. Creating a data base and a report will be covered. Modification of data base structures and data along with report modification will be presented. An introduction to simple dBASE system programming will also be reviewed. Students will complete assignments in each of the areas mentioned. 3 credits

CSC133 Access Applications and Programming is a course in which the students will learn some of the most important topics of using Access and Visual Basic for Applications, including reviewing database objects, designing and documenting a database, using import wizards, action queries and SQL, designing complex forms, creating complex reports and queries, customizing the user interface, using Visual Basic for applications, error handling, comp box programming and activeX controls, data access object model, activeX data object model and security, and connecting to the Web. 3 credits

CSC135 A+ Certification provides an introduction to the basic concepts of managing and maintaining your computer. The course maps directly to CompTIA's A + Certification exam A+ 220-701 Essentials exam and the A + 220-702 Practical Applications exam. The course involves two parts which comprise a PC Repair Essentials component followed by a PC Repair Practical Applications component. Both components include balanced content on hardware and software. 4 credits

CSC140 Introduction to Networking provides an introduction to the basic concepts of computer networks and preparation for CompTIA’s Network + certification exam. The course covers a broad range of networking-related topics, including protocols, topologies, transmission media, and network operating systems as well as the practical skills of network design, maintenance, security, and troubleshooting. 3 credits

CSC141 Computer Network Security Fundamentals provides the student with network security principles and implementation. The technologies used and principles involved in creating a secure computer networking environment will be included, as will authentication, the types of attacks and malicious code that may be used against networks, the threats and countermeasures for e-mail, Web applications, remote access, and file and print services. A variety of security topologies will be discussed, as well as technologies and concepts used for providing secure communications channels, secure internetworking devices, and network medium. 3 credits
Co-requisite: DAP140 or CSC140.

CSC147 Introduction to Wireless Networking is designed to provide the skills needed to install, configure, manage, monitor, and troubleshoot a wireless LAN. The topics covered include wireless fundamentals, standards, and working with wireless devices. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CSC140.

CSC148 Server-Side Scripting with ASP covers the concepts and techniques of generating dynamic web pages using Active Server Pages (ASP). Students will learn how to process and store data submitted through HTML forms, personalize web pages, and access, update, and store data from a database. This course also introduces object-based programming through the use of built-in functional objects of ASP. This course includes a large component of hands-on dynamic web page production and computer work. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CSC109, CSC133.

CSC151 Computer Forensics Investigation provides students with the tools and techniques of computer forensics and investigation including personal computer operating system architectures and disk structures. Students will learn the investigative process, examine the profession, set up an investigator’s office and laboratory, and learn forensic hardware and software tools. Learning the importance of digital evidence controls and how to process crime and incident scenes will also be presented and discussed. Students will learn the details of data acquisition, computer forensic analysis, e-mail investigations, image file recovery, investigative report writing, and expert witness requirements. This course maps to the CompTIA Security+ certification. 3 credits

CSC154 Introduction to Windows 8 prepares students to develop the skills needed to administer, deploy, and manage the Windows 8 operating system, desktop/metro, and to prepare for the MCTS certification exam. Students will learn how to migrate to Windows 8. The course also covers the new features in Windows 8, such as advanced security, and how those features compare to Windows 7 and earlier versions of Windows. Installing, troubleshooting, and problem solving will also be reviewed. 3 credits

CSC156 Microsoft Windows Server 2008 prepares students to administer networks and to pass the MCITP 70-646 certification exam. This course includes topics such as installing, configuring, managing and troubleshooting. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CSC140 or permission of the instructor.

CSC160 Introduction to Data Communications is designed to introduce data processing students to the world of data communications and networking concepts. The course will include an introduction to networks, analog/digital communications, data channels, modems, interfaces, transmission problems, control codes, protocols, multiplexers, distributed processing, performance, simulations, satellite, packet switching, LANs, system design, technical control, case studies, and the future outlook for data communications technology and potential available positions for employment opportunities. 3 credits

CSC161 Oracle I Introduction to SQL prepares students for Oracle certificate IZO-007. Students learn to analyze complex business scenarios and create a data model, a conceptual representation of an organization's information. Students are introduced to database concepts, basic SQL SELECT statements, table creation and management, constraints, data manipulation and transaction control, and exploring SQL topics in application development. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS101 or permission of instructor.

CSC162 Microsoft Windows 7 is designed to provide the information and skills needed to install, configure, manage, monitor, troubleshoot and administer the Microsoft Windows7 operating system. 3 credits

CSC163 Database Design Principles builds upon the fundamental concepts of database systems to apply the principles of database implementation and database design. Topics include conceptual and logical data modeling, strongly-typed and weakly-typed data, entity-relationship modeling, and the implications of database design as related to user requirements. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS101 or consent of instructor.

CSC170 Introduction to Java Programming covers fundamental programming, including selection and repetition, as well as fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming and design. Advanced topics include inheritance, polymorphism, exceptions, recursion, and searching/sorting. Select compilers are used, such as Net Beans and/or Eclipse. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP109 or CSC109 or permission of the instructor.

CSC182 Scripting Languages covers the core concepts of Internet programming, using VBScript and JavaScript, that are needed to bridge the gap between Web programming languages and Web architecture from both the client and server side. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS124.

CSC201 Business System Analysis and Design prepares students to do system analysis and design through practical cases and examples. Students will work on actual systems projects and solve problems similar to those occurring in the workplace. This course covers a blend of traditional and current development techniques, such as client-server and object-oriented development, graphical user interfaces, and electronic data interchange. This is a capstone course. 4 credits

CSC202 Creative Design (I) introduces theories of creative thinking and their application to concept development and problem-solving. Historic principles and emerging brain research related to creative thinking are examined and applied to creative projects that engage students in the use of interdisciplinary tools and techniques drawn from art, design, science, and technology. Topics include individual creative processes, creative team dynamics, problem identification, solution design, and analysis of process, resulting in innovative, successful resolutions shared with others. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

CSC203 Seminar in Information Systems designed to make the student aware of the need to stay current in the field of new technologies by identifying and evaluating new technologies, reading technical journals and literature for current and future trends, and continuing their formal education in the latest technology and trends available. 1 credit

CSC204 Seminar in Information Systems is designed to make the student aware of the need to stay current in the field of new technologies by identifying and evaluating new technologies, reading technical journals and literature for current and future trends, and continuing their formal education in the latest technology and trends available. 1 credit

CSC205 Computer Science I is an introduction to the basic concepts of an object-oriented programming language such as Java or C++. This course introduces such programming concepts as data types, structures, decision making, looping, functions, arrays, files, and objects. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: DAP106, DAP109 or CSC106, and/or CSC109 or consent of instructor.

CSC218 Computer Science II continues the development of object-oriented programming and problem-solving skills by using an object-oriented language such as Java or C++. The student will obtain a solid foundation in advanced object-oriented topics such as abstract data types, overload operators, dynamic memory, exception handling, inheritance, and polymorphism. The student will also examine data structures such as stacks, queues, and trees, as well as perform efficiency analysis on searching and sorting algorithms.
4 credits
Pre-requisites: DAP205 or CSC205, MAT201 or consent of instructor.

CSC223 Mechanical III Solid Modeling is designed to provide the student with skills to develop three-dimensional solid models of a mechanical nature. Students learn to generate complex composite solids by performing Boolean operations on solid primitives. This building block approach utilizes constructive solid geometry and boundary representation concepts as a basis for defining the model. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP112 or CSC112.

CSC224 Autolisp Programming is a version of the Lisp programming language that has functions specific to AutoCAD. This course is designed to provide all levels of AutoCAD users with the knowledge to develop programs and functions that will customize AutoCAD to optimize productivity. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP112 or CSC112.

CSC225 Tactical Perimeter Defense is a course in the principles and practices of advanced network security fundamentals and technologies involved in securing the network perimeter. The student will obtain a solid foundation in security practices such as TCP/IP addressing, routing, packet filtering, and the installation of proxy servers, firewalls, and virtual private networks (VPNs). This course prepares the student to take the current Security Certified Network Specialist (SCNS) exam. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP141 or CSC141 or permission of instructor.

CSC229 Computer Animation III is a continuation of Computer Animation I and II. Students will apply the functions of various 3DMAX plugins such as Hypermatter, Clay Studio, Sand Blaster, Splash, and Trees to develop a portfolio. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: DAP219 or CSC219.

CSC235 Strategic Infrastructure Security is a course in the principles and practices of hardening strategic systems and pathways in the network infrastructure. The student will be exposed to a solid foundation in security topics such as penetration testing, capturing and analyzing packets, signature analysis, operating system hardening, risk analysis, router security, wireless security, and cryptography. This course prepares the student to take the current Security Certified Network Professional (SCNP) exam. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CSC225 or permission of instructor.

CSC258 Cisco Certified Network Associate prepares students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam 640-802. It focuses on implementing, managing, protecting, and troubleshooting small to medium-size enterprise branch networks. 4 credits
Pre-Requisite: CSC140 or permission of the instructor.

CSC260 Oracle II Database Programming SQL prepares students for Oracle certificate IZO-047. Students will implement database design by creating a physical database using SQL, the industry-standard database programming language. Upon completion of this course, students have the opportunity to sit for the exam/s required to qualify as an Oracle Certified Associate Developer. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CIS161 or CSC161.

CSC263 Oracle III Database Fundamentals I will provide students with a conceptual understanding of the Oracle database architecture and how its components work and interact with one another. Students will learn how to create an operational database and properly manage the various structures in an effective and efficient manner. This course is designed to prepare students to take the Oracle Certified Associate exam: Exam #1Z0-031, which is the first of three certificates needed to be certified as an Oracle Database Administrator (DBA). 3 credits
Pre-requisites: CIS261, CSC261 or permission of instructor.

CSC264 Oracle IV Database Fundamentals II provides an introduction to the topics concerning data backup and disaster recovery procedures using Oracle Recovery Manager (RMAN), SQL, and Enterprise Manager. Advanced Oracle 10g options such as Scheduler, Automatic Storage Management (ASM), and Database Resource Manager are discussed. Oracle 10g also performs a number of operations automatically. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: CIS263, CSC263 or consent of instructor.

CSC 265 Oracle V Database Security Auditing addresses the implementation of database security on modern business databases. Hands-on projects and case studies are used to reinforce and apply skills and knowledge to real-world scenarios on database security and auditing. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: CIS264, CSC264 or consent of instructor.

CSC273 CBWEP-CADD provides the opportunity for a student to obtain work experience that is productive in nature and an essential part of the overall educative process. The work assignment is related to the student's field of study and/or career interests. The work assignment serves as an extended laboratory and training station supervised by a faculty sponsor from the student's career field and an on-site representative of the employer and is coordinated by the CBWEP coordinator. This assignment includes minimum standards of performance and assessment measures. 3 credits

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Criminal Justice, Corrections & Law Enforcement

CRJ101 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System is an introduction to the social and historical background of law enforcement and corrections. This course includes an orientation to the United States criminal justice system while examining the roles of the modern federal, state, and local law enforcement and correctional agencies. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

CRJ105 Introduction to Corrections provides a comprehensive overview of corrections, dealing with jails and prisons as well as the historical development of corrections and the legal processing from the incident to the prison. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ108 Police Supervision and Personnel Management will introduce students to methods and techniques involved in becoming an effective police supervisor. The course focuses on police leadership issues regarding the responsibilities toward administrative, legal, and personnel problems. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ110 Police Community Relations will introduce students to the influences of culture, race, and ethnicity and emphasize building relationships between law enforcement and the community they serve. This course focuses on the contact police officers have with the community and stresses the importance of cultural awareness, understanding, and respect. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ125 Issues in Corrections will introduce students to the treatment and rehabilitative policies of women prisoners. This course will address the theory, practice, and issues of the rehabilitative programming needs of women in prison such as: education, health care needs, mental health issues, physical/emotional abuse issues, substance abuse issues, parenting issues, and discharge planning for released women prisoners. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ133 Forensic Science I will introduce students to the theory and methods of the collection, preservation, and identification of physical evidence. Emphasis is on the history and development of forensic science, processing the crime scene, and the introduction to various items of physical evidence, including firearms, identification of ballistics, document examination, fingerprints, properties of glass and soil, and dangerous drugs.
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ201 Criminal Investigation is a study of the basic principles of investigation. This course will introduce students to the theory of investigation, search of the crime scene, questioning of witnesses and suspects, collection and preservation of evidence, sources of information, interviews and interrogations, techniques in surveillance, stakeouts, and raids for their implications in proper criminal investigative reports and court proceedings. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ205 Criminal Law will introduce students to the general legal principles of American criminal law. This course will survey the historical development of criminal law, the elements of crime under the common law, and the fundamental theories of criminal responsibility. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ206 Correctional Counseling will introduce students to the role of the correctional officer in counseling. The student will review counseling and intervention techniques as well as the theoretical foundations of relevant criminological studies and behavioral interventions as well as cognitive therapies, social learning models and positive psychology. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CRJ105.

CRJ211 Probation, Parole and Community Corrections in the United States will introduce students to the development, organization, and functions of probation, parole, and community-based correctional programs in the United States criminal justice system. Particular attention is paid to the legal, functional, and administrative aspects of these sanctions, as well as the impact on sentencing practices and offender reintegration. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CRJ105.

CRJ214 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice will introduce students to all aspects of juvenile justice from arrest, intake, adjudicatory hearings, dispositions, and aftercare. This course is an orientation to the divergent theories, philosophies, values, attitudes, and historical events that have contributed to the operation of the modern juvenile justice system. It will examine the legal rights of juveniles and landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ221 Criminology will introduce students to the general theories of crime causation and the impact crime has on society. This course will provide a general survey of the nature and causes of crime and efforts of the criminal justice system to predict, prevent, modify and correct this behavior. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ225 Police Organization and Administration will introduce students to the organizational structure and administrative procedure for the implementation of police functions, recruitment, career advancement, leadership, staffing, supervision and morale. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

CRJ233 Forensic Science II expands upon the methods of collection, preservation, and identification of physical evidence. This course emphasizes methods of examination such as fires, explosions, computer forensics, bite marks, hairs and fibers, and blood splatter patterns. The responsibilities and duties of the forensic pathologist will also be covered.
Pre-requisites: CRJ101, CRJ133.

CRJ235 Corrections Administration will introduce students to the history and philosophy of corrections as well as the strategic, fiscal, resource and risk management principles related to corrections administration. This course will also examine the contemporary issues of concern confronting correctional administrators. 3 credits
Co-requisite: CRJ105.

CRJ299 Criminal Justice Externship will enable students to connect academic course work to the knowledge, skills, and emotional challenges that are found in the professional world. The course focuses on the many issues involved in the total externship experience; especially those related to student’s personal and professional development during his/her externship education. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: CRJ101.

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Economics

ECO221 Economics-Micro (SS) is the study of economic behavior of individual households and firms and the determination of the market prices of individual goods and services. The basics of demand, supply, elasticity, price theory, and factor markets are stressed and students are shown how to graph and explain basic economic relationships. (May be substituted as an elective in the business programs.) 3 credits
Pre-requisite: ECO222.

ECO222 Economics-Macro (SS) is the study of large-scale economic phenomena. Emphasis is placed on the impact of government, inflation, unemployment, and fiscal and monetary policies. International trade and currency considerations as comparative economic systems are included. (May be substituted as an elective in the business programs.) 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT093.

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Education

EDU101 Foundations of Education is a survey course designed to introduce students to the American educational system. Students will examine the history of education, educational philosophies, student diversity, learning styles, school organization, school law, and current issues in education. 3 credits
Co-requisites: EDU102, EGL101.

EDU102 Foundations of Education Field Experience is the school-based companion course to Foundations of Education. Students will work with classroom teachers (minimum of 15 hours) to develop an understanding of the teaching profession, students and schools. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EDU101.

EDU131 Principles of Early Childhood is a foundations course, which examines early childhood education from a variety of perspectives including historical and developmental. Students will examine typical and atypical child development, learning theories, diversity, developmentally appropriate practice, teaching models, and critical issues related to teaching and child growth and development. Approved by the Maryland State Department of Education. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EDU202.

EDU132 Early Childhood Curriculum and Methods introduces the student to the curriculum, materials, and methods that support the creation of developmentally appropriate environments, developing curriculum based on Early Childhood Standards (NAEYC, Headstart), and differentiated instruction to meet the needs of children birth to eight years of age. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU131.
Co-requisite: EDU203.

EDU145 Introduction Outdoor Adventure Education will provide students with the opportunity to explore the diversity of adventure/outdoor education. Students will be introduced to the historical, philosophical, psychological and social foundations of recreation and adventure. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU101.
Co-requisite: EDU146.

EDU146 Introduction to Outdoor Adventure Experiential Learning is a site-based course that guides students through the applied learning experience. Students will work with teachers and staff to develop an understanding of outdoor adventure education programs and the professions. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EDU145.

EDU147 Outdoor Adventure Program Planning will provide experience in designing wilderness-based, experiential learning activities. The primary focus will be outdoor adventure education planning, implementation, and evaluation. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU145.

EDU150 Classroom Management is designed to assist future and current teachers in the development of systematic strategies and techniques for organizing and managing classroom activities and students. Research and practitioner-based models for classroom management will be introduced and explored. Emphasis will be based on real-world solutions for creating supportive and respectful environments that encourage all students to view themselves and learning in a positive light. 3 credits

EDU180 Exploring Teaching as a Career is for individuals who have at least a Bachelor’s degree and are exploring the profession of teaching as a career choice. Topics presented include introductory information on teaching strategies, assessment, classroom management and school culture. This one-credit course includes seven and one half hours of classroom/online instruction and six full days in a K-12 school. Students will be required to complete six days in a field placement with a mentor teacher in a public school classroom. 1 credit

EDU200 Introduction to Childcare Administration provides an overview of the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and operate a child care facility. Topics of special consideration may include leadership, enrollment and public relations, staff management, facilities, regulations, parent relations, and program development. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU132.

EDU202 Principles of Early Childhood-Field Experience is the child care center/school-based companion course to Principles of Early Childhood I. Students will work with classroom teachers (minimum of 15 hours) to develop an understanding of the teaching profession, students, schools, and child care centers. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EDU131.

EDU203 Early Childhood Curriculum and Methods Field Experience is the childcare center/school-based companion course to Early Childhood Curriculum and Methods. Students will work with classroom teachers (minimum of 15 hours) to develop an understanding of the teaching profession, students, schools, and childcare centers. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EDU132.

EDU207 Educational Psychology-Field Experience is the school-based companion course to Educational Psychology (PSY207). Students will work with classroom teachers (minimum of 15 hours) to develop an understanding of the teaching profession, students, and schools. 1 credit
Co-requisite: PSY207.

EDU210 Processes and Acquisitions of Reading focuses on the concepts of how children learn to read, cognitive processing, and the development of language, including the structure of language and the cognitive precursors to reading acquisition. This course will also investigate the role of prior knowledge, motivation, reading difficulties, and personal significance to developing readers. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU101 or permission of instructor.

EDU211 Instruction of Reading provides an introduction to the stages of reading development and the role of word recognition, vocabulary, and comprehension in literacy development. The course will also analyze a variety of approaches to teaching reading in order to meet the needs of a diverse student population. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU210.

EDU212 Assessment for Reading Instruction presents important concepts for the development of a diagnostic reading and improvement program. Students will explore a variety of formal and informal assessment tools and techniques for use in the classroom. For each assessment tool, students will develop administrative procedures, explore strengths and limitations of the instruments and techniques, and develop instructional implications from the assessment results. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU101.

EDU245 Outdoor Adventure Education Leadership will provide students with the knowledge and skills to plan, organize, and lead outdoor adventure programs in both the public and private sectors. Course material will focus on current theories and principles used in outdoor adventure programs, such as leadership theories, group dynamics, program planning and administration, environmental impact, and safety. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU145.

EDU246 Wilderness Encounters will enable students to develop an understanding of our relationship to the natural world and wilderness, the role of wilderness in the American psyche, and effective techniques for facilitating wilderness experiences. Students will lead a wilderness experience as a part of this class. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU145.

EDU247 Wilderness First Responder will provide students with the knowledge to make critical medical and evacuation decisions. Students will develop competencies in responding to and treating medical emergencies in wilderness settings. Completion of this course may result in certification by either Stonehearth Open Learning Opportunities (SOLO) or the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) as a Wilderness First Responder. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU145.

EDU248 Ropes Initiatives Facilitation will enable students to facilitate team building initiatives and ropes course experiences. Skills developed include group facilitation and the technical skills of rope work, belaying, and rescues. Skills are within industry standards established by the Association for Challenge Course Technology (ACCT) and Project Adventure and prepares the student for potential certification. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU145.

EDU251 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth is an introductory survey of the field of special education in which the psychological, sociological, behavioral, and physical characteristics of exceptional children and youth are explored. Emphasis is placed on characteristics, issues, laws, and educational approaches to teaching the exceptional child. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EDU101.
Co-requisite: EDU253.

EDU253 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth-Field Experience is the school-based companion course to Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth. Students will work with classroom teachers (minimum of 15 hours) to develop an understanding of the teaching profession, exceptional students, and schools. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EDU251.

EDU260 Children's Literature provides opportunities to select, read, evaluate, and utilize a wide variety of children's literature from preschool through middle school. It is expected that students become familiar with various authors, poets, and illustrators of these books, as well as explore the role of children's literature across the curriculum. Resources that support the use of children's literature will also be explored. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL102.

EDU263 Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area I is the first of two courses designed to meet the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) requirements for reading coursework for current and prospective teachers in the secondary content areas. The course introduces teachers to the assessment of student reading, cognitive strategies in reading, incorporating reading skills through student-centered instruction, and intrinsic and extrinsic motivation for reading. 3 credits

EDU264 Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area II is the second of two courses designed to meet the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) requirements for reading coursework for current and prospective teachers in the secondary content areas. This second course expands on Part I, focusing on types of reading, skills in reading, and instruction. 3 credits

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Engineering

PHE100 Introduction to Autodesk Inventor will prepare students to use the 3D solid modeling software, Autodesk Inventor, for Computer Aided Engineering. The course will cover the development of 3D parametric, solid models; assembly modeling and checking; and production of engineering drawings. Also covered are introductions to sheet metal modeling, motion analysis, and stress analysis using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Autodesk Inventor Certified Associate Exam. Students will be required to complete projects, write reports, and make presentations.
3 credits
Prerequisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE110 Microstation Fundamentals will enable students to create a basic 2D drawing using Bentley’s Microstation. The student will create and edit elements and add text and dimensions to a Microstation design file. This course will help the student understand the Microstation user interface, its unique drawing technique and input settings, view windows, and mouse operation. The student will prepare a drawing for print to multiple formats including paper, image, and portable document format (pdf). 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE120 AutoCAD Fundamentals for Engineers will introduce students to the use of the 2D CAD capabilities of AutoCAD to produce engineering graphics. The course will review the principles and practices of engineering drawing while covering the use of AutoCAD to produce conceptual and working engineering drawings. Upon completion of the course students will be prepared to take the AutoCAD Certified Associate exam. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE125 Introduction to AutocCAD Civil 3D leads students through the land development process using the civil engineering and surveying tool AutoCAD Civil 3D. The course will cover techniques for organizing project data, working with points, creating and analyzing surfaces, modeling road corridors, creating parcel layouts, performing grading and material calculations, and producing plans. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE120.

PHE128 Introduction to Revit Architecture will lead students through the process of creating a building model using the 3D building information modeling software, Revit. The course will cover the use of building information modeling (BIM) in the building industry, development of 3D model elements, views, dimensions and annotations, schedules, basic structural items, drawing sheets and printing, site and topography, and rendering. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE130 Solidworks Fundamentals will introduce students to the use of the 3D solid modeling software, Solidworks. Students will cover the development of 3D models, analysis of the solid models using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), assembly modeling and checking, kinematic simulation, rapid prototyping, and production of engineering drawings. Upon completion of the course students will be prepared to take the CSWA (Certified Solidworks Associate) exam. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE140 Pro/ENGINEER Fundamentals will introduce students to the use of the 3D solid modeling software, Pro/ENGINEER, and its associated analysis tool, MECHANICA. Students will be exposed to the development of 3D models, production of engineering drawings, assembly modeling, and analysis of the solid models using finite element methods. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE150 Excel for Engineers and Scientists will introduce students to spreadsheet basics as well as the robust engineering and scientific applications of Excel for numerical calculation and data analysis. Students will learn how to compose spreadsheets, solve problems, analyze data, and present results. Students will produce structured, efficient, and documented workbooks with data entry cells, summary results and statistics cells, and commented cells. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT201.

PHE155 SPSS for Engineers and Scientists introduces students to the use of SPSS statistical software and its application to engineering and science. The course covers the use of SPSS in statistical analysis. Histograms, scatter plots, the normal curve, correlation, regression, law of averages, standard error, and common tests of significance are covered. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT121 and completion of a college-level science or engineering course.

PHE160 Introductory Multisim will introduce students to the National Instruments Multisim software for entering and analyzing basic dc and ac circuit designs. Multisim software is a program that acts as a virtual electronics laboratory. Students will use the Multisim program to create electronic circuits, to simulate the circuits, and use virtual laboratory instruments to make electronic measurements. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT121.

PHE170 LabVIEW Fundamentals will introduce students to the use of the graphical programming language, LabVIEW, with an emphasis on its use for data acquisition and instrument control. Lab activities and projects will require students to design, write, debug, and test automation software to control real instruments. Students will develop of virtual instruments (VI’s) using LabVIEW’s intuitive graphical block diagrams and convenient front panels. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take the Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer exam. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT201.

PHE175 Advanced Topics in LabVIEW is a project-based course that builds on the foundation gained in LabVIEW Fundamentals. This course will explore previously introduced topics in more detail and will introduce techniques for writing reliable, efficient, reusable, and maintainable code for engineering applications. Students will be required to design, produce, and test code for a range of problems involving data acquisition, machine communication, and data processing. The course will develop advanced skills in programming, problem solving, and system specification. Through project work, students will also gain an understanding of hardware topics relating to sensors and control systems. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE170.

PHE180 Matlab Fundamentals for Engineers guides students from basic computations through engineering applications of symbolic mathematics, numerical techniques, and graphical analysis. Students will focus on problem-solving and the basics of programming, M-files, functions, plotting, matrix algebra, and numerical and graphical techniques. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT201.

PHE185 DC, AC Circuits and Devices with Lab covers basic circuit elements through RLC circuits. Ohm's and Kirchoff's Laws, Thevenin's and Norton's Theorems, superposition, node and mesh analysis, phasors, DC and AC steady state and transient analysis are studied. The measurement, design, and construction of circuits containing passive elements and operational amplifiers are included. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem solving, software simulation and lab experience. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT121.

PHE200 Introduction to Engineering Graphics covers elements of graphical problem solving in engineering design, data analysis, and communication. Students work on multiple projects that include written and oral presentations, CAD modeling and analysis, creation of engineering drawings, data analysis with spreadsheets, and engineering calculations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT121.

PHE201 Introduction to Engineering Design is a project-based course that introduces the product development process. Working in teams and using modern computer tools, students complete the design of a complex system requiring problem specification, product research, product design, product modeling and analysis, fabrication, testing, redesign, and product presentation. Engineering fundamentals such as data analysis, properties of materials, mechanics, heat transfer, circuits, computer programming and other engineering topics are studied. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE200.
Co-requisite: MAT201.

PHE211 Statics will introduce students to the study of the equilibrium of bodies, both solids and fluids, under the influence of various kinds of loads. Forces, moments, couples, equilibrium of a particle, equilibrium of a rigid body, analysis of trusses, frames, and machines, internal forces in structural members, friction, center of gravity, centroids, composite bodies, and fluid pressure are topics which will be considered. Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: PHY207, MAT202.

PHE212 Dynamics will introduce students to the study of systems of heavy particles and rigid bodies at rest and in motion. Force, acceleration, work-energy, and impulse-momentum relationships, and motion of one body relative to another in a plane and in space are topics which will be considered. Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE211.

PHE213 Mechanics of Materials will introduce students to the study of stress and deformation of beams, shafts, columns, tanks, and other structural, machine, and vehicle members. Topics include stress transformation using Mohr's circle, centroids and moments of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams, derivation of elastic curves, and Euler's buckling formula. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE211.

PHE221 Thermodynamics will introduce students to the interaction between heat and mechanical energy in materials and machines and its application to mechanical systems. Topics covered include first and second laws of thermodynamics, cycles, reactions, and mixtures, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, fluid-energetics laboratory, and the application of these engineering sciences to energy systems design. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: PHE211, PHY208.

PHE225 Digital Electronics and Instrumentation with Lab will introduce students to the science of digital design. The topics covered include: Boolean algebra, logic theorems, logic circuits and methods for their simplification (Karnaugh maps), gates, timing, arithmetic circuits, flip flops, programmable logic arrays (PLAs), sequential circuits and similar devices. The student will gain an understanding of digital design principles and will simulate, construct and analyze digital circuits using industry standard circuit design software along with a digital breadboard. Problem-solving and electrical laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: PHE185 or PHY208.

PHE285 Principles of Electric Circuits with Lab will introduce students to the design, analysis, simulation, construction and evaluation of electronic circuits. The topics covered include: Kirchoff’s Laws, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, node and mesh analysis, DC and AC steady and transient analysis for first and second order circuits, frequency response of circuits and filters, operational amplifiers, diode and transistor circuits, as well as Fourier and Laplace transform analysis. Problem-solving, software simulation and electrical laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: PHY208.
Co-requisite: MAT246.

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English

EGL090 Fundamental Reading Writing and Study Skills is an entry-level literacy course that presents study, reading, and writing skills to prepare students for college coursework in all disciplines. The course presents strategies for time management, metacognition, note-taking, test preparation, and test taking. It focuses on the reciprocal skills of reading and writing and emphasizes skill building in the areas of critical reading, vocabulary development, distinguishing main ideas from details, patterns of organization, and the use of supporting details in writing. 4 credits
Co-requisite: EGL092 dependent upon assessment score.

EGL092 Integrated Reading and Writing Level I students will acquire basic skills including fundamentals of grammar, critical reading, paragraph and summary writing, an introduction to essay writing, and an introduction to documentation. All aspects of this course will incorporate reading and writing as reciprocal skills. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

EGL093 Integrated Reading and Writing Level II offers the writing, reading, and critical thinking skills necessary for success in college-level English. Students will read and write paragraphs, essays, and summaries, as well as practice documentation and grammar. This course covers the objectives of EGL092 at a more sophisticated level and requires, in addition, persuasive writing and intermediate documentation. All aspects of this course will incorporate reading and writing as reciprocal skills. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: C or better in EGL090, EGL092.

EGL101 Freshman Composition (E) teaches students the skills necessary to read college-level texts critically and to write effective, persuasive, thesis-driven essays for various audiences. The majority of writing assignments require students to respond to and synthesize texts (written and visual) through analysis and/or evaluation. Students also learn how to conduct academic research, navigate the library’s resources, and cite sources properly. The course emphasizes the revision process by integrating self-evaluation, peer response, small-group collaboration, and individual conferences. Additionally, students are offered guided practice in appropriate style, diction, grammar, and mechanics. Beyond completing multiple readings, students produce a minimum of 7,500 words, approximately 5,000 words of which are finished formal writing in four-five assignments, including a 2,000-word persuasive research essay. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: C or better in COL081 and EGL093 or equivalent skills assessment.

EGL102 Composition and Literature (H) introduces students to the genres of fiction, poetry, and drama in order to gain a fuller understanding and appreciation of these literary forms. Several brief compositions and an analytical research paper are assigned. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

EGL112 Scriptwriting I introduces the concepts and practices used in writing fictional and commercial scripts for film and television. Topics studied include the use of literary sources (finding, adapting, and writing), storyboards, shot composition, editing, camera angles, lighting, and sound. Additional topics studied include framing the story and evaluating the methods and strategies of successful film directors. Procedures for developing the creative process are emphasized, including personal introspection, broad inquiry, group collaboration, and maximizing the impact of a film upon its audience. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

EGL203 British Lit. to 18th c. (H) covers the development of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 18th century. Through readings, class discussions, and lectures, the student should develop a critical awareness of and an appreciation for English literature and will be given at least one opportunity to express that knowledge in a brief research paper. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of EGL102.

EGL204 British Lit. 18th c. to Present (H) covers the development of English literature from the 18th century to the present. Through readings, class discussions, and lectures, the student should develop a critical awareness of and an appreciation for English literature and will be given at least one opportunity to express that knowledge in a brief research paper. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of EGL102.

EGL205 American Lit. to 1865 (H) surveys American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War. Through readings, class discussions, and lectures, the students should discover the ways in which writers projected their sense of the meaning of the developing American experience. Social and intellectual background will receive special emphasis. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of EGL102.

EGL206 American Lit. 1865 to Present (H) covers the development of American literature from the Civil War through the present. Through readings, class discussions, and lectures, the student should discover the ways in which writers projected the meaning of the developing American experience. Social and intellectual background will receive special emphasis. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Satisfactory completion of EGL102.

EGL209 Introduction to African-American Literature (H) explores the writers and themes fundamental to the African-American literary tradition from the 18th century to the present. The course introduces critical questions and paradigms that are central to the study of African-American letters and to the nation's multicultural heritage. Students should gain a greater understanding of and appreciation for African-American literature's contributions to the rich diversity that is American culture, history, and literature. Course materials include fiction, poetry, drama, literary theory, essay, autobiography, film, folktale, sermon, spirituals, blues, and contemporary music. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL102.

EGL210 Topics in World Literature (I) places Western and non-Western works of literature in dialogue, focusing on a particular theme, time period, or genre. By featuring works of literature from five continents, the course will analyze the ways culture does and does not inform aesthetic decisions and historical interpretations. The class will address questions about how dominant narratives are created, challenged, and revised, as well as address meaningful commonalities in the literature of disparate cultures. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL102.

EGL211 Technical Writing entails the study and practice of written communications in professional settings. In an ongoing workshop, students will be asked to think critically about rhetorical situations; analyze and address case studies; collaborate with team members; research, design, and write effective, ethical texts; develop multiple literacies for multiple audiences; respond constructively to peer writers; present texts through a variety of electronic media; and improve oral presentation and discussion skills. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: CIS101, EGL101.

EGL212 Scriptwriting II continues the study of writing dramatic scripts for television and film. Emphasis is placed on defining and articulating effective narrative structure. Students study successful screenplays and build their own portfolios by writing several short scenes and longer scripts. Emphasis is placed on expanding scriptwriting skills by determining each character's dramatic need, using action and dialogue, isolating emotional and dramatic elements, moving the narrative forward, and solving scriptwriting problems. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL112.

EGL213 Introduction to Film (H) introduces students to cinematic theory, practice, and criticism. Through readings, class discussions, and lectures, the student should discover the ways in which directors communicate through the art form of film. Special emphasis will be placed on developing "cineliteracy," the literacy of the cinema. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL102.

EGL214 Introduction to Journalism introduces students to the basics of reporting and news writing. Students will learn about researching articles, reporting, and conducting interviews, then use those skills to write several articles. Students learn the history of news coverage, news judgment, the importance of the First Amendment, and basic libel law. The course emphasizes the reporting and writing skills necessary for newswriting work. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

EGL215 Introduction to Creative Writing (H) introduces students to the techniques and practice of writing and reading the genres of poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction with the goal of understanding the creative process of writers, the state of contemporary culture as seen in current literature, and the students' own writing process, passions, and limitations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

EGL260 Children's Literature (H) provides opportunities to select, read, evaluate, and utilize a wide variety of children's literature from preschool through middle school. It is expected that students become familiar with various authors, poets, and illustrators of these books as well as explore the role of children's literature across the curriculum. Resources that support the use of children's literature will also be explored. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL102.

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Environmental Science

ENV106 Introduction to Environmental Science (S) is an introduction to major changes in the local, regional and global environment and to the use of the scientific process in protecting and restoring the environment. This course includes such topics as climate change, groundwater contamination, and the reduction of the human carbon footprint. 3 credits
Co-requisites: EGL101, ENV116, MAT093 or MAT095.

ENV116 Introduction to Environmental Science Lab is designed to actively involve the student in the process of science. The student will perform experimental activities that include direct experience with real phenomena, use of technology, and the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data. 1 credit
Co-requisite: ENV106.

ENV150 Introduction to Energy and Sustainability with Lab will prepare students to investigate energy, its generation, use and conservation strategies. The dependence of physical and biological processes on energy flow in the Earth's system will be studied. The role of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources to power human activities will be explored. The influence of the economic, political, environmental and social factors on energy decisions will be examined. Field trip experiences may be required. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093 and MAT092 or appropriate skills assessment.

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Equine

EQS137 Horseback Riding (ACT) will allow students, through self-scheduled lessons, to earn activity credits while learning how to ride a horse or improving current riding skills. Students are required to arrange their own weekly riding lessons in consultation with a College approved instructor, at a College approved facility. Lessons are the student's expense and may be taken in any discipline: English, Western or other. 1 credit
Co-requisite: EQS139.

EQS139 Basic Horse Handling provides an introduction to safe handling procedures for working with a variety of horses and situations. This course will model ways a student may develop competence and self-assurance around horses. 2 credits

EQS142 Introduction to Equine Care and Maintenance is designed to provide a basic foundation for working with horses. Using hands-on activities, the lessons teach elements of horse ownership: general terminology, horse selection, stabling requirements, and basic care of the healthy horse.  Students gain a greater understanding of conformation and selection of the horse, costs of ownership, nutrition, grooming, anatomy and care of the hoof, health care, breeds, and colors.  3 credits
Co-requisite: EQS139.

EQS144 Equine Nutrition and Feeding focuses on the basic concepts of nutrition and feed evaluation for horses. Students will learn to evaluate the horse’s body condition, surroundings, work load, and other factors to develop a proper diet regimen for the best care of the horse. Students will also become familiar with forage analysis procedures and learn to interpret feed analysis reports. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT092.

EQS145 Equine Health and Maintenance will provide students with knowledge and opportunities to recognize equine health parameters. Topics include general care, routine health care, equine emergencies, digestive disorders, respiratory disorders, parasites, equine dentistry, hoof care, and diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of equine lameness. Students will be exposed to the skills necessary for basic horse care as well as the treatment and prevention of common horse ailments. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EQS139.

EQS146 Introductory Equine Field Study is a total immersion into the equine industry focusing on the basic tasks in caring for horses. Students will work on farms throughout the area to gain hands-on practical experience in the everyday workings of running a horse business. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS145.

EQS148 Equine Anatomy and Physiology will enable students to understand the horse's systems, growth and development. This course will cover the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, and endocrine systems. Through this course students will acquire the knowledge and training to understand the structure and function of the horse's body. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EQS139.

EQS155 Equine Community Service Experiential Learning will allow students to experience many community events, practices, and stables in the equine industry. Students will be required to complete volunteer service at several different community oriented, instructor-approved equine establishments to gain valuable hands-on training. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS146.

EQS241 Equine Facilities Management is designed to prepare students for employment in the horse industry. Hands-on activities will cover elements of farm management: stabling requirements, event management, and safe horse handling techniques. Students will be shown skills necessary for running a successful horse facility. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS139.

EQS242 Equine Reproduction Evaluation and Selection focuses on the genetic improvement of horses. Students will actively apply lecture material in the lab each week. Topics will include mare and stallion reproductive physiology, live cover, artificial insemination, semen collection and evaluation, synthetic hormone regulation, foaling, and newborn care. Course is offered during the spring semester only. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT093, EQS148.

EQS243 Business Management in the Horse Industry is designed to prepare students for running their own equine business. Lessons will demonstrate elements of farm management: communication, regulation, marketing, staff management, sales and service, and skills necessary for running a successful horse business.
3 credits

EQS245 Equine Pasture and Land Management topics include zoning and permit requirements, paddock design and maintenance, water and electric needs, erosion problems, poisonous plants, soil conditions, and seeding methods. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS142.

EQS246 Advanced Equine Field Study builds upon the Introductory Equine Field Study course by presenting more advanced tasks in the care of horses such as hoof care, first aid techniques, and treating colic. Students will work on farms throughout the area to gain hands-on practical experience in the everyday workings of running a horse business. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS146.

EQS248 Equine Pathology focuses on training students to recognize symptoms, diseases, and infections. Students will learn to properly identify system functions and determine areas of concern, and develop treatment options once a condition is diagnosed and confirmed. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS148.

EQS253 Judging and Course Design will allow students to experience understand and practice judging different levels of equine conformation based on breed and show riding in both English and Western Styles. The course will focus on the dynamics of designing and setting up jump courses for both stadium jumping and cross country jumping events as well as set up for Western trail classes, speed classes and other Western events. Students will be required to attend both local English and Western shows throughout the semester.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: EQS139.

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Fitness/Wellness

FWS110 Fundamentals of Personal Training I will begin to prepare students for employment in the fitness industry. Students will be introduced to the functions of the musculoskeletal and cardio-respiratory systems and their roles in exercise conditioning. Additional topics will include business building and marketing, ethical standards and practices, energy metabolism, nutrition, and weight management. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.
Co-requisite: FWS111.

FWS111 Fundamentals of Personal Training I Lab is the college/clinical lab for students to practice and demonstrate beginning skills associated with the personal trainer role. Emphasis will be placed on basic fitness center operations and include customer service, cleanliness, and standard operating procedures. 1 credit
Co-requisite: FWS110.

FWS120 Fundamentals of Personal Training II builds and expands upon the knowledge base established in Fundamentals of Personal Training I. Topics will include biomechanics, exercise physiology, advanced program design, and program design for special populations. At the conclusion of this course and its corresponding lab, the student will be eligible to take the national certification exam in personal training.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: FWS110, FWS111.
Co-requisite: FWS121.

FWS121 Fundamentals of Personal Training II Lab is the college/clinical lab for students to continue to practice and demonstrate skills associated with the personal trainer role. Emphasis will be placed on fitness center services which include conducting orientations and assessments, health promotion programming, and writing basic exercise prescriptions. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: FWS110, FWS111.
Co-requisite: FWS120.

FWS130 Essentials of Fitness Assessments introduces the student to a variety of laboratory and field assessments/tests utilized in the fitness and wellness industry. Emphasis will be placed on conducting/administering exercise tests and prescriptions; administering health screening assessments and interpreting data; and providing results counseling. Associated health benefits and risks will also be addressed. Physical fitness assessments included are tests of cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, joint flexibility, body composition, and pulmonary capacity. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: FWS110.

FWS135 Physiology of Exercise provides a basis for understanding the body's physiological responses to exercise and sport. Emphasis will be placed upon the practical application of exercise physiology principles to physical training practices. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO209, EGL101.

FWS180 Fitness Prescription for Special Populations emphasizes the skills and knowledge necessary to work with populations beyond the “apparently healthy.” Coursework includes basic exercise prescriptions for various populations such as: youth, sports-specific, obese, pre/post natal, senior, and clientele experiencing an illness affecting health and wellness. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218, FWS110, FWS111.
Co-requisite: BIO203.

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Geographic Information Systems

GIS101 Geographic Information System (I) will provide an introduction to the principles and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. It examines the accuracy and applications of geographic information, while emphasizing how it can be used to enhance the decision-making processes of many disciplines such as transportation and logistics, business, biology, physics, and government and planning. There will be hands-on projects that will focus on real-world problems. 3 credits

GIS111 Advanced Geographic Information Systems is a continuation of GIS 101. The course will utilize ArcGIS software's advanced capabilities in analyzing spatial relationships in GIS. The course also introduces students to ArcGIS's Network Analyst, Spatial Analyst, and 3D Analyst extensions, which increase the functionality and analytical power of the software in producing a GIS. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: GIS101.

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Geography

GEO101 Physical Geography (SS) is an introduction to geography as a discipline: its concepts, scope, and tools as well as the physical elements such as climate, land forms, natural resources, processes, and their relationships. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

GEO102 Cultural Geography (SS) examines the distribution of humanity over the globe. Human settlement, culture, and land use patterns, as well as complex factors which interact to create cultural diversity, cultural conflicts, and differences in levels of economic development, are studied. Basic map reading and interpretation skills are included. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

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Health

HEA130 Healthful Living I (I) investigates the concept of total wellness and the consequences of behavior. By defining wellness techniques and identifying risk factors, students will be able to attain their optimal level of health. The course will explore pertinent aspects of the composition of health, stress management, human sexuality, disease prevention, addictive substances, nutrition, weight control, contraception and the life cycle. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

HEA136 Stress Management is designed to help students understand the concept of stress. Students will learn to identify and assess their stressors and be able to implement techniques to assuage and eliminate stress. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

HEA140 Alcoholism and Drug Addiction focuses on the various theoretical models related to addiction and their implications in our society. Multiple aspects of the alcohol, tobacco, and other drug addiction services continuum of prevention, intervention, treatment, and aftercare will be examined. Cultural influences as well as the issues related to family, gender and disabilities will be examined. Co-occurring disorders as well as the debate regarding addiction vs. compulsive behaviors for areas such as gambling and food issues is also addressed. This course is appropriate for all students and especially for those entering any aspect of the health care professions. 3 credits

HEA173 Human Sexuality (I) provides the student with the opportunity to view this topic from a variety of perspectives: cultural, social, political, physical, and psychological. Issues are examined from viewpoints such as gender, individual, family, and professional roles. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

HEA174 Women’s Health Issues provides an introduction to women’s health concerns over the adult life span, with a primary focus on health promotion and proactive care. Common health issues affecting women from biological, medical, economic, historical, socio-cultural and political perspectives will be explored.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

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Health Care

HCD120 Medical Terminology is designed to improve the students' professional medical vocabulary. Students will build medical vocabulary, while recognizing the prefixes, suffixes, root words, combining forms and abbreviations. Topics include how to spell, define and pronounce medical terms associated with the major body systems as well as label basic anatomy and recognize common pathology terms. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL090.

HCD150 Social Media in the Health Care Setting introduces the healthcare student to beginning concepts in social media channels available today as they apply to communications in the field of health care.  The course will explore basic concepts in sociology and online privacy, investigate and use specific social media channels, as well as review HIPAA and the legal aspects of social media. Using specific examples, students will be exposed to how businesses in health care adopt social media strategies and develop policies for responsible social media use by staff and patients. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

HCD232 Introduction to Clinical Pharmacology will introduce the student to pharmacological concepts, medication uses, classification systems, administration, safety precautions, side effects, contraindications, and adverse reactions. Appropriate patient monitoring and teaching related to prototype drugs from each major classification will also be addressed.  This course will benefit those students enrolled in health professions programs. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL101, MAT092.

HCD270 Ethical Issues in Healthcare will introduce students to ethical issues in today’s healthcare environment. Students will be exposed to a comprehensive view of ethical issues including how to identify ethical issues and how to address a wide variety of ethical situations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

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History

HST101 Western Civilization I (to 1715) (H) is an overview of western Civilization from prehistory to the early 18th century. Topics include Ancient Near East, Minoan Civilization, Greek Civilization, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Scientific Revolution. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST102 Western Civilization II (H) covers the development of Western Civilization from the early 18th century to the present. Topics include the Old Regime, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, socialism, imperialism, nationalism, World War I, totalitarianism, World War II, and the Post War Era. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST103 History of Criminal Justice examines the evolution of crime, punishment, and police work from the colonial era to the present.  It examines old county jails, headline-grabbing criminal escapades of long ago, methods of discontinued punishment, and unheralded peace officers.  Topics include the whipping post, hangings, and lynchings.  The goal of the course is to look at how crime has changed and how law enforcement and policing methods have evolved. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

HST110 World History I (H) considers the evolution and interaction of world-class civilizations across the Eurasian land mass with consideration also given to Africa and the Western Hemisphere. The variety and common denominators of the human experience are emphasized. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST111 World History II (H) begins with the Age of Discovery and addresses the unfolding of the Modern Era and the evolution of the global village. The impact of such forces as the Scientific Revolution, democratic revolutions, Industrial Revolution, nationalism, Marxism, colonial independence, the world wars, and technology are explored in a world context. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST135 History of Rock (I) is a survey of the development of popular music in the 20th and 21st centuries. The origins of rock music, significant artists, influences from different genres, and influence on cultural society will be discussed. Selected representative pieces will be absorbed through directed listening. Topical research papers are required. No music reading skills necessary. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST141 Survey of Art History (I) is a survey course which explores art forms and aesthetic intentions from prehistory to the present. The course of study parallels the development of Western Civilization and emphasizes the relationship of art forms to that development. Major emphasis is on painting, sculpture, and architecture. The course may include museum trips. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

HST201 History of the United States (to reconstruction) (H) addresses the history of the United States from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War era. Topics include Old World Background, Colonial America, the War for Independence, the Early Nation, Jeffersonian Democracy, the Jacksonian Age, Ante Bellum South, Manifest Destiny, and the Civil War. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST202 History of U.S.(reconstruction-present) (H) follows the internal development of the United States and the nation's rise as a world power from the post-Civil War period to the present. Topics include Western Movement, immigration, urbanization, industrialization, populism, progressivism, imperialism, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and post war America. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST203 History of Maryland concerned with the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Maryland from initial settlement to the present. Topics include 17th century Maryland, 18th century Maryland, Maryland before the revolution, Maryland and revolution, Maryland in the new nation, Jacksonian Maryland, the Civil War, Maryland and reform, prosperity and depression, the New Deal in Maryland, World War II, and beyond.
3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST251 Introduction to African American Studies is designed to expose students of all races to the rich heritage of the African-American. This survey course will incorporate oral as well as written projects, and will cover almost 400 years of African-American involvement in the making of America. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST253 Civil War and Reconstruction covers the time period 1845 to 1877 and includes the study of the origins, development, and outcomes of the greatest struggle this nation has known between the North and South: the American Civil War and the Reconstruction. Emphasis will be placed on political, economic, and social issues leading to the war and the effort to reunite the nation after the war. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

HST298 Western Military History stresses change in military operations from the period of Ancient History to the present. Those changes have been influenced by political, social, economic, moral and geographical factors. How these factors have shaped the battles, tools, and outcomes of war will be a major emphasis of this course. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

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Horticulture

HCS142 Soils And Fertillizers Lab will familiarize students with methods and equipment used in soil science. Soil morphology, physical properties, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and testing for nutrients will be covered. Students will use and interpret the US Soil Survey. 1 credit
Co-requisite: HCS152.

HCS152 Soils and Fertilizers will provide the student with an understanding of the composition, fertility, and biology of soil. This course will include structure and classification of soils, soil biology, plant nutrients, and soil amendments. Reduction of excess nutrients in streams, rivers, and the Chesapeake Bay will be emphasized.
3 credits

HCS153 Landscaping Construction and Maintenance will provide the student with an understanding of the materials, equipment, preparations, and methods of installation used in landscape construction. 3 credits

HCS154 Botanical Garden Studies investigates regional public gardens. Topics may include landscaping for conservation, native plants, warm season meadows, rain gardens, formal gardens, wildflowers and woodland gardens, conservatories, topiary, green roofs, woody plants in the landscape, children's gardens, historical gardens, seasonal gardens, Japanese gardens, butterfly gardens, community gardens, and garden design. As there are numerous public gardens, topics and gardens visited will change from session to session. 3 credits

HCS155 Woody Plants Identification I is one of two courses within the Horticultural Science Program that will familiarize students with a significant number of woody trees and shrubs commonly found in our local environment. Evergreen and deciduous species will be covered. For each plant, students will discuss nativity, landscape use and establishment, cultural requirements, seasonal interest, and environmental considerations. Species for study will be selected based upon the season in which the course is offered and will include plants specified for the Maryland Certified Professional Horticulturist (CPH) basic exam. 2 credits

HCS156 Herbaceous Plants I is one of two courses within the Horticultural Science Program that will focus on the identification of herbaceous plants found in our local environment. Perennials, annuals, and houseplants will be covered and will include grasses, groundcovers, vines, and ferns. For each species, students will discuss use, culture, native habitat, pest and disease considerations, and seasonal interest. Species for study will be selected based upon the season in which the course is offered and will include plants specified for the Maryland Certified Professional Horticulturist (CPH) basic exam. 2 credits

HCS160 Woody Plants Identification II is one of two courses within the Horticultural Science Program that will familiarize students with a significant number of woody trees and shrubs commonly found in our local environment. Evergreen and deciduous species will be covered. For each plant, students will discuss nativity, landscape use and establishment, cultural requirements, seasonal interest, and environmental considerations. Species for study will be selected based upon the season in which the course is offered and will include plants specified for the Maryland Certified Professional Horticulturist (CPH) basic exam. 2 credits

HCS161 Herbaceous Plants II is one of two courses within the Horticultural Science Program that will focus on the identification of herbaceous plants found in our local environment. Perennials, annuals, and house plants will be covered and will include grasses, groundcovers, vines, and ferns. For each species, students will discuss use, culture, native habitat, pest and disease considerations, and seasonal interest. Species for study will be selected based upon the season in which the course is offered and will include plants specified for the Maryland Certified Professional Horticulturist (CPH) basic exam. 2 credits

HCS253 Introduction to Landscaping Design will provide the student with an exposure to the landscape design process with an emphasis on residential landscaping. Students will draw and read landscape plans, discuss appropriate plant selection and sustainability as well basic landscape design principles and landscape design styles. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: HCS156 or HCS161 and HCS155 or HCS160.

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Licensed Practical Nurse

LPN201 Care of Childbearing/Childrearing Families introduces family systems theory in the study of childrearing/childbearing families. Study will include growth and development, normal pediatric and obstetric concepts, and stressors affecting individuals and family systems, with emphasis on the role of the practical nurse in patient care. 2 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO209, NUR105, NUR115.
Co-requisites: LPN206, LPN211.

LPN205 Advanced Medical-Surgical and Psychiatric Theory, LPN emphasizes the care of adults and aged clients in various health care settings. The focus is on the study of clients with complex alterations in wellness related to pathophysiological and psychological stressors with emphasis on the role of the licensed practical nurse in patient care. 2 credits
Pre-requisites: LPN201, LPN211, BIO209, BIO219.
Co-requisites: LPN206, LPN215.

LPN206 Professional Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing, LPN Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Nursing, LPN introduces the students to complex, political, and ethical matters that have an impact on professional nursing. The role and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse and the importance of problem solving are emphasized. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: NUR105, NUR115, BIO209, BIO219.
Co-requisites: LPN201, LPN205.

LPN211 Clinical Lab III: Childbearing/Childrearing Families is the clinical companion to LPN 201. Clinical experiences are conducted in the inpatient and outpatient settings with observational experiences of maternal, newborn, and pediatric clients. The inpatient setting involves caring for clients with medical and surgical stressors, with a focus on the issues of childrearing/childbearing families. The student is expected to integrate theoretical knowledge and the nursing process into the practice of nursing while utilizing effective communication skills when caring for clients in both the acute and chronic health care setting as the LPN member of the healthcare team. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: BIO209, NUR105, NUR115.
Co-requisite: LPN201.

LPN215 Clinical Lab IV: Medical/Surgical/Psychiatric is the clinical companion to LPN205. Clinical experience focuses on clients experiencing emotional and/or psychiatric stressors concurrent with medical and surgical stressors. Students increase proficiency in practical nursing procedures, while integrating theoretical knowledge, effective communication skills, and the nursing process, into the practice of nursing when caring for medical, surgical, and psychiatric clients in both the acute and chronic health care setting as the LPN member of the healthcare team. 1 credit
Pre-requisites: BIO209, NUR105, NUR115.
Co-requisite: LPN205

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Mathematics

MAT091 Basic Mathematics prepares students with essential arithmetic skills in whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio, proportions, percentages and measurement. Computerized instruction is integrated in a formal classroom setting. A hybrid format is available, in which some testing takes place in the Math Lab but all other work is done on the Web. 4 credits
Co-requisites: COL081, EGL082.

MAT092 Introductory Algebra introduces the fundamental study of signed numbers, exponents, radicals, polynomials, rational expressions, first and second-degree equations, simultaneous equations, and graphing of linear equations. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in MAT091.
Co-requisites: COL081, EGL082.

MAT093 Intermediate Algebra provides higher-level prerequisite mathematical knowledge that is needed in a variety of college level courses. A graphics calculator is used to create and analyze graphs, scatter plots and curves of best fit. Solutions to linear, quadratic, radical, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and other higher-order equations are found using both graphical and analytical methods. Properties of functions such as increasing and decreasing intervals, approximation of local maximums and minimums, horizontal and vertical asymptotes, and intercepts are studied. Additional topics include the solving of inequalities and systems of linear and nonlinear equations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in MAT092.
Co-requisite: EGL093.

MAT095 Intermediate Algebra for Non-Stem Students focuses on essential skills in intermediate algebra for students whose program of study does not require them to take MAT 093 Intermediate Algebra or MAT 121 Precalculus. This course is designed for non-Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math students (non-STEM). Topics include a review of linear equations and formulas, function notation, quadratic functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT092.
Co-requisite: EGL093.

MAT121 Precalculus (M) prepares the student for the study of calculus, discrete mathematics, and other mathematics intensive disciplines through the study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics include functions, laws of logarithms, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, solutions of trigonometric equations, the Laws of Sines and Cosines, and polar coordinates. A problem solving approach utilizes applications and the graphics calculator throughout the course. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: Grade of C or better in MAT093, EGL093.

MAT123 Finite Math (M) uses problem solving to develop critical thinking skills and illustrate mathematics in daily life. Each student will be exposed to a variety of problem solving methods including but not limited to the following: systems of linear equations, matrices, the Gauss-Jordan method, inequalities and linear programming, sets and counting techniques, probability, difference equations, Markov processes and game theory. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093, grade of C or higher in MAT093 or MAT095.

MAT127 Introduction to Statistics (M) introduces students to the study of measures of central tendency, measures of variation, graphical representation of data, least squares regression, correlation, probability, probability distributions, sampling techniques, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis is on applications from a variety of sources including newspapers, periodicals, journals, and many of the disciplines that students may encounter in their college education. Students shall be expected to gather and analyze data, and formally report the results of their research. The use of technology and statistical software is integrated throughout the course. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093 and a Grade of C or better in MAT093 or MAT095.

MAT128 Introduction to Statistics II (M) addresses the design of experiments and analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, categorical data analysis, simple linear regression, multiple regression and model building, quality control charts, and time series analysis. The emphasis is on applications using data sets from a variety of sources and disciplines including newspapers, periodicals, journals, the Web and many of the disciplines that students may encounter in their college education. Students will gather and analyze data, and formally report the results of their research. The use of technology and statistical software is integrated throughout the course. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT127.

MAT133 Mathematical Concepts and Structures I is a course for elementary education majors. It focuses on solving word problems, operations on sets and their properties, functions and their notation, logic, development of numeration systems through rational numbers, arithmetic operations and algorithms, the real numbers using exponents and decimals, and algebraic thinking and notation. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093, grade of C or better in MAT093.

MAT134 Mathematical Concepts and Structure II is a course for elementary education majors. It focuses on applications of ratios and proportions, percents, simulations in probability, counting theory, graph theory, statistical concepts and their applications, basic notation in geometry, polygonal curves, linear measures, basic shapes and relationships in two- and three- dimensions, geometric networks, congruence and similarity, geometric constructions, areas and volumes of geometric shapes, and the Cartesian coordinate system with reflections and translations. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093, grade of C or better in MAT093.

MAT201 Calculus I with Analytic Geometry (M) introduces students to the mathematical techniques for limits (including L'Hospital's Rule), differentiation, and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential, hyperbolic, and inverse hyperbolic functions. Applications of differentiation and integration are studied. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093, grade of C or better in MAT121.

MAT202 Calculus II with Analytic Geometry (M) introduces integration techniques, improper integrals, sequences, infinite series, conic sections and polar coordinates. Students will solve applied problems related to limits, differentiation, integration, and infinite series. A computer algebra system, such as Maple, is introduced and used. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in MAT201.

MAT203 Multivariable Calculus (M) provides the student with a study of three-dimensional space, introduction to hyperspace, partial differentiation, multiple integration, vectors in a plane, and topics in vector calculus to include Green's Theorem, Stokes’ Theorem, and the divergence theorem. Knowledge of a computer algebra system, MAPLE, is expanded. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT202.

MAT236 Discrete Structures (M) introduces the fundamental tools, topics, and concepts of discrete mathematics. This course emphasizes counting methods, proof techniques, and problem-solving strategies. Topics include Boolean algebra, set theory, symbolic logic, predicate calculus, number theory, the methods of proofs (direct, indirect, and inductive), objective functions, equivalence relations, graphs, set partitions, combinatorics, modular arithmetic, summations, and recurrences. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT201.

MAT240 Introduction to Linear Algebra (M) introduces the basic concepts of linear algebra: vector spaces, applications to line and plane geometry, linear equations and matrices, linear transformations, eigenvalues, determinants, and quadratic forms. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in MAT202 or permission of the Math Department Chair.

MAT246 Introduction to Differential Equations (M) introduces the basic techniques for solving and/or analyzing first and second order differential equations, both linear and nonlinear, and systems of differential equations. The use of a mathematical software system is an integral part of the course. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in MAT202.

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Music

MUC102 Piano Class I is the study of basic music skills as they apply to piano playing. Music theory, sound production, pedal techniques, posture, hand position and knowledge of beginning repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement in a group setting. 1 credit

MUC104 Guitar Class (H) is the study of basic music skills as they apply to playing guitar and musical knowledge as it relates to the guitar. Emphasis is placed on practical application of music and technique as well as music theory, music literature, music history, guitar history, and musical genres. No prior music reading skills or experience necessary. 3 credits

MUC110 Music Theory and Musicianship I is an in-depth study of the fundamental rudiments of music that are essential for all musicians. Concepts and elements of musical design and theory, including a study of timbre, rhythm, pitch, texture, and principles of form are studied concurrently with musicianship elements, including mastery of pitch and rhythm and the development of aural skills through sight singing, dictation, improvisation, and keyboarding applications. 4 credits
Co-requisites: MUC102 and MUC120 or MUC124.

MUC111 Music Theory and Musicianship II will focus on further skill mastery of the fundamental rudiments of music that are essential for all musicians. Concepts and elements of musical design and theory, including a study of triads, cadences, dominants, and suspensions are studied concurrently with musicianship elements, including mastery of pitch and rhythm and the development of aural skills through sight singing, dictation, improvisation, and keyboarding applications. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MUC110.
Co-requisite: MUC114, MUC121 or MUC125.

MUC114 Piano Class II is the study of early intermediate music skills as they apply to piano playing. Music theory, sound production, pedal techniques, posture, hand position, and knowledge of early intermediate solo and ensemble repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement in a group setting. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: MUC102.

MUC120 Chamber Ensemble I will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a chamber ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class. 2 credits

MUC121 Chamber Ensemble II will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a chamber ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class. 2 credits

MUC122 Music Appreciation (H) is a survey of the development of music from ancient civilizations to the present day. Emphasis is placed on major genres, composers, and repertoire from the Middle Ages through the Contemporary eras. Listening skills and music terminology are discussed. No music reading skills necessary. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

MUC124 Chamber Choir I will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a vocal ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, harmonizing, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class.
2 credits

MUC125 Chamber Choir II will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a vocal ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, harmonizing, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class.
2 credits

MUC128 Introduction Audio Technology (I) provides instruction and hands-on experience with a variety of audio equipment. Students learn the principles of electricity, electronics, acoustical theory, and the operation of audio equipment. 3 credits

MUC135 History of Rock (H) a survey of the development of popular music in the 20th and 21st centuries. The origins of rock music, significant artists, influences from different genres, and influence on cultural society will be discussed. Selected representative pieces will be absorbed through directed listening. Topical research papers are required. No music reading skills necessary. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

MUC136 Survey of World Music (H) explores a wide range of traditional world music and cultures. The origins of a culture’s music, unique instruments, significant genres, notable artists, and their influence on society will be discussed. No music reading skills necessary. 3 credits

MUC143 Music Fundamentals (H) introduces students to beginning musical concepts.  Note reading, intervals, scales, triads, and structures are discussed along with music history, instruments, and repertoire. No prior music experience necessary. 3 credits

MUC151 Film Music (H and I) is a survey of music in cinema from the early days of silent film to modern day blockbusters. Emphasis is placed on composers, genres, repertoire, and functions of film music. No music reading skills necessary. 3 credits

MUC154 Band/Orchestra I will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a large ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with an established ensemble in the region. Students should contact the music department faculty to find an appropriate ensemble to participate in, and an audition may be required. In addition to the scheduled class time, students must be available for rehearsals off campus. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: MUC120.

MUC210 Music Theory and Musicianship III is an in-depth study of analysis of form and chromatic harmony. Tonicization, modulation, and neapolitan chords are studied concurrently with musicianship elements, including mastery of pitch and rhythm, and the development of aural skills through sight singing, dictation, improvisation, and keyboarding applications.  4 credits.
Pre-requisite: MUC111.
Co-requisite: MUC220 or MUC 224.

MUC211 Music Theory and Musicianship IV completes the music major's study of chromatic harmony and large-scale traditional forms, which are studied concurrently with musicianship elements such as mastery of pitch and rhythm and the development of aural skills through sight singing, dictation, improvisation, and keyboarding skills. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MUC210.
Co-requisite: MUC221 or MUC225.

MUC220 Chamber Ensemble III will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a chamber ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class. 2 credits

MUC221 Chamber Ensemble IV will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a chamber ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class. 2 credits

MUC224 Chamber Choir III will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a vocal ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, harmonizing, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class.
2 credits

MUC225 Chamber Choir IV will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a vocal ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with other students and a music director. Musical elements such as technique, musicality, ensemble cooperation, vocabulary, harmonizing, and performance practice will be incorporated throughout the class.
2 credits

MUC254 Band/Orchestra II will focus on the performance of a range of musical styles in a large ensemble setting. Students will learn repertoire and participate in rehearsals culminating in a public performance while working with an established ensemble in the region. Students should contact the music department faculty to find an appropriate ensemble to participate in, and an audition may be required. In addition to the scheduled class time, students must be available for rehearsals off campus.
Pre-requisite: MUC120.


MUC263 Diction for Singers I (Eng./Ital.) is the study of English and Italian diction as it applies to vocal arts. Students will have the opportunity to learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), learn to pronounce English as it applies to singing, learn pronunciation, and demonstrate a basic understanding of Italian words. Throughout the semester students will learn repertoire to apply the techniques learned in class. 2 credits

MUC264 Diction For Singers II (Fr./Ger.) is the study of French and German diction as it applies to vocal arts. Students will have the opportunity to learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), learn pronunciation, and demonstrate a basic understanding of French and German words. Throughout the semester, students will learn repertoire to apply the techniques learned in class. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: MUC263.

MUL101-MUL104 Guitar/Bass Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing guitar or bass guitar. Students choose acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or bass guitar and learn technique and music of pop and rock musicians. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.  1 credit per course

MUL105-108 Classical Guitar Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing classical guitar. Students study fingerstyle technique and learn the music of Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary composers. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement.  Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL109-112 Jazz Guitar Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing jazz guitar. Students study technique, improvisation, and the music of various jazz genres. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL113-MUL116 Voice Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to vocal arts. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.
1 credit per course

MUL117-MUL120 Woodwind Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing woodwind instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the woodwind family (clarinet, saxophone, flute, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL121-MUL124 Piano Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing piano. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.
1 credit per course

MUL125-MUL128 String Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing a string instrument. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the string family (violin, cello, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL129-MUL132 Drum/Percussion Lessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing drums and/or percussion instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL133-MUL136 BrassLessons I-IV are the study of music skills as they apply to playing brass instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the brass family (trumpet, trombone, horn, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL201-MUL204 Guitar/Bass Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing guitar or bass guitar. Students choose acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or bass guitar and learn technique and music of pop and rock musicians. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.  1 credit per course 

MUL205-208 Classical Guitar Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing classical guitar. Students study fingerstyle technique and learn the music of Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary composers. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement.  Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL209-212 Jazz Guitar Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing jazz guitar. Students study technique, improvisation, and the music of various jazz genres. Music theory, sound production techniques, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL213-MUL216 Voice Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to vocal arts. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.
1 credit per course

MUL217-MUL220 Woodwind Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing woodwind instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the woodwind family (clarinet, saxophone, flute, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL221-MUL224 Piano Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing piano. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL225-MUL228 String Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing a string instrument. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the string family (violin, cello, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL229-MUL232 Drum/Percussion Lessons V-VIII are the study of music skills as they apply to playing drums and/or percussion instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required. 1 credit per course

MUL233-MUL236 Brass Lessons V-VIII  are the study of music skills as they apply to playing brass instruments. Music theory, sound production techniques, breathing, posture, and knowledge of repertoire are developed through weekly reinforcement. Students choose an instrument from the brass family (trumpet, trombone, horn, etc.) and meet once a week in a private lesson. Practice time outside of class is required.
1 credit per course

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Nursing

NUR101 Concepts and Processes in Nursing introduces the student to the profession of nursing, the Neuman Systems Model (NSM), nursing as a discipline, nursing concepts, and the nursing process. Special emphasis is on utilizing the Neuman Systems Model and the nursing process in planning nursing care of elderly clients. 
2 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208 and BIO218, EGL101, MAT093.
Co-requisites: NUR104, NUR114.

NUR104 Nursing Fundamentals Theory will introduce basic nursing concepts and processes with emphasis on assisting the aged adult to adapt in illness to achieve an optimum level of wellness. The student will be introduced to the nursing process and to the Neuman Systems Model - the conceptual framework used throughout the nursing program. 5 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208 and BIO218, EGL101, MAT093.
Co-requisites: NUR101, NUR114.

NUR105 Care Of Adult and Aging Clients emphasizes the nursing care of adult and aging clients experiencing medical-surgical problems. Course work includes the study of clients undergoing alterations in levels of wellness related to physiological stressors. Study involves application of the Neuman Systems Model and the nursing process to promote attainment/maintenance of optimal levels of wellness. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: NUR101, NUR104, NUR114.
Co-requisite: NUR115.

NUR114 Clinical Lab I: Nursing Fundamentals is the college/clinical laboratory that provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate safe and competent psychomotor and communication skills necessary for client care. The student will be expected to use the nursing process and the Neuman Systems Model when demonstrating their nursing skills. The demonstration of client care is based upon theoretical knowledge acquired from the co-requisite courses. 2 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218, EGL101, MAT093.
Co-requisites: NUR101, NUR104.

NUR115 Clinical Lab II: Medical/Surgical Settings provides clinical laboratory learning experience in medical/surgical settings. Emphasis is on the utilization of the nursing process and the Neuman Systems Model in the care of adults and aging clients experiencing physiological stressors. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: NUR101, NUR104, NUR114.
Co-requisite: NUR105.

NUR130 LPN to ADN Transition is designed to introduce the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to the role of the Associate Degree Registered Nurse (ADN). Course content includes college success strategies, various roles of the nurse, role transition from LPN to RN, nursing concepts including the Neuman Systems Model (NSM), nursing process, pharmacology, and care of adult and aging clients. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.
Co-requisites: BIO200, BIO209, BIO210, BIO219, NUR131.

NUR131 LPN to ADN Clinical Lab is the clinical companion to NUR130. Clinical experience focuses on the care of adult and aging clients experiencing medical and surgical stressors. Students will demonstrate proficiency in technical nursing procedures, caring for multiple clients, and will begin to utilize the nursing process at the level of a Registered Nurse. The student is expected to integrate theoretical knowledge into the practice of nursing and utilize effective communication skills. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: EGL101.
Co-requisites: BIO200, BIO209, BIO210, BIO219, NUR130.

NUR201 Care of Childbearing/Childrearing Families focuses on the introduction and use of Family Systems Theory in addition to the nursing process and the Neuman Systems Model in the study of childbearing/childrearing families. Study will include developmental/normal and complex stressors affecting individual, family, and community systems, coupled with the nursing implications for assisting these clients to attain, maintain, or regain optimal level of wellness. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO200, BIO209, BIO210, BIO219, NUR105, NUR 115.
Co-requisites: NUR 211, PSY 201.

NUR202 Cardiac Rhythms Interpretation and Treatment will introduce the student to basic cardiac rhythm interpretation and appropriate evidence-based treatment modalities for life-threatening arrhythmias. The collection and interpretation of 12-lead EKGs will also be addressed. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: NUR105, or currently licensed RN, LPN, Medical Assistant, or Paramedic.

NUR204 Care of Clients with Complex Stressors utilizes the Neuman Systems Model (NSM) and the nursing process to emphasize care of adult and aged clients in various healthcare settings and includes study of clients experiencing complex alterations in level of wellness related to pathophysiological and/or psychological stressors. The concept of synthesis and integration of nursing knowledge in the care of multiple clients is included. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: NUR201, NUR211, PSY201.
Co-requisites: NUR206, NUR214.

NUR206 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues in Nursing stresses the professional, legal, political, and ethical issues which influence the nurse’s role and responsibilities in today’s health care environment. Concerns and issues which confront nurses, particularly the new nursing graduate, are discussed and problem-solving techniques are utilized. Evidence-based nursing practice, professional activities and continued education in the field of nursing are emphasized. 2 credits
Co-requisite: NUR204.

NUR211 Clinical Lab III: Care of Childbearing/Childrearing Families stresses the utilization of the nursing process and the Neuman Systems Model in the care of reproductive health clients and childbearing/childrearing families and their members in a variety of inpatient, outpatient, and other settings.
4 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO200, BIO210, BIO209, BIO219, NUR105, NUR115.
Co-requisites: NUR201, PSY201.

NUR214 Clinical Lab IV: Medical/Surgical/Psychiatric stresses the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of clients in the medical/surgical and psychiatric settings using the Neuman Systems Model and the nursing process. In the medical/surgical clinical settings, the students are provided opportunities to develop their leadership and organizational skills through supervision of peers and other nursing personnel and multiple patient assignments. In the psychiatric clinical setting, the therapeutic skills necessary for providing nursing care for psychiatrically hospitalized clients are utilized. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: NUR201, NUR211, PSY201.
Co-requisite: NUR204.

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Philosophy

PHI101 Introduction to Philosophy (H) introduces students to traditional philosophical problems. The course objectives are to learn to think critically about philosophical topics and to apply basic philosophical concepts to everyday life. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI201 Ethics - Contemporary Moral Problems (H) introduces students to philosophical thinking about morality, moral problems, and moral judgments. Emphasis is placed on the meaning of ethical questions and how ethical judgments and decisions are justified. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI202 Clear Thinking: An Introduction to Inductive Logic (H) introduces students to the techniques and methods of critical thinking. Among the topics included are analysis and systematization of ideas, inductive fallacies, statistical samples, and strategies for presenting arguments. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI203 History of Ideas I (H) is an examination of the major intellectual ideas which have shaped Western Civilization since the ancient Greek philosophers to Descartes. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI204 History of Ideas: Modern (H) introduces students to the major intellectual ideas which have shaped Western Civilization in the last 300 years. The course emphasizes the ideas which are the core of our cultural heritage and are the foundation of our thinking in the 20th century. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI205 Philosophy of Religion (H) introduces students to the vast array of religious beliefs and possible explanations for them, the arguments for God's existence and criticisms of those arguments, and the philosophical/psychological foundations of faith. Emphasis is placed on what people believe. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI206 Current Philosophical Issues in America investigates the development of religious movements in the American culture. Emphasis is placed on depicting the religious life of the American people as a function of the dominant motifs of the American experience. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PHI270 Ethical Issues in Healthcare will introduce students to ethical issues in today’s healthcare environment. Students will be exposed to a comprehensive view of ethical issues including how to identify ethical issues and how to address a wide variety of ethical situations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

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Physical Education

PED104 Walking for Fun and Fitness I (ACT) introduces students to the components and benefits of an effective walking program including a walking plan and health related issues. At the end of the course, each participant will complete a fitness program modified to meet his or her individual needs. 1 credit

PED135 First Aid and CPR will provide students with the opportunity to learn the skills needed to act quickly and effectively in the case of an accident or emergency situation. Students participate in various simulated injury and emergency situations. Students may achieve American Red Cross certification in Adult, Child and Infant CPR and First Aid. 3 credits

PED146 Golf I (ACT) is an introduction to the sport of golf. The activity-based course will include golf history, selection of equipment, and fundamentals of the full golf swing. Golf etiquette and rules of the game will be discussed along with various aspects of the short game, such as chipping, pitching, and putting. 1 credit

PED162 Karate I (ACT) introduces the Isshinryu form of karate. Through systematic training, self-defense skills are developed and basic stances, blocks, strikes, and quick escapes are practiced. Emphasis is placed on character building and attitude. 2 credits

PED166 Co-Ed Self Defense (ACT) introduces the maneuvers of self-defense. Students will be given the opportunity to learn the vital areas of the body which could be used as a target in the event of being attacked, how to use one’s own body as a weapon, how to use ordinary objects as a weapon, and how to subdue an attacker. Emphasis is placed on how to recognize and avoid dangers; and if avoidance is not possible, how to use self-defense techniques. 1 credit

PED169 Tai Chi Chuan (ACT) introduces the student to the Yang style of this ancient Chinese martial art, which promotes a highly sophisticated mode of body coordination and more acute mental processes. It has been used for centuries as both a method of relaxation and fitness. Students will be given the opportunity to learn the basic principles, characteristics, history, and performance of the Yang style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan. 1 credit

PED173 Step Aerobics I (ACT) will introduce the fundamental skills of aerobics. This activity-based course will provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate beginner skill level for low impact aerobics along with principles of body toning. Each student will create individual fitness goals. 2 credits

PED174 Weight Training I (ACT) is a physical activity-based course designed to incorporate aspects of resistance training. Students will be given guidelines for a workout routine during the first phase of the course including recommended nutritional practices. During the second phase of the course, students will design their own weight training program geared to reaching their personal goals. The emphasis of the course is the development of muscular strength and endurance. 2 credits

PED175 Hatha Yoga I (ACT) introduces students to the principles of postural alignment, breathing techniques for increased energy, and body/mind relaxation techniques for stress reduction. It is an activity-based class that encourages the students to enhance their health and skill-related fitness. 2 credits

PED177 Physical Conditioning (ACT) is an activity-based class that will allow students the opportunity to enhance their health- and skill-related physical fitness. All students will participate in a variety of activities to improve every aspect of their fitness level. At the conclusion of the course, students will design their own fitness program. Each student is given an individual workout routine to follow throughout the semester. Students will be responsible for classroom material with paper and pencil assessments. 2 credits

PED180 Introduction to Physical Education introduces students to the foundations of physical education and career opportunities. Emphasis is placed on the physiological, socio-cultural, and psychological foundations of the profession. This course also explores career opportunities within areas of exercise science, coaching, health, fitness, and sport. This course does not satisfy activity requirements in any degree or certificate program. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

PED183 Basketball Theory and Officiating introduces the student to coaching techniques and the knowledge and mechanics of officiating. Emphasis is placed on developing a sound philosophy, organizing an effective program, implementing coaching strategies, and officiating skills. This course does not satisfy the physical education activity requirements in any degree or certificate program. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL090.

PED184 Baseball/Softball/Theory and Officiating introduces the student to specific areas related to baseball and softball theory and officiating. The theory section presents basic philosophies and offensive and defensive tactics of baseball and softball. The officiating segment studies the definitions, rules, and mechanics used by officials; aiding the student in passing the certification exams to officiate baseball and softball. This course does not satisfy the physical education activity requirements in any degree or certificate program.
3 credits

PED196 Tennis I (ACT) is a physical activity-based introduction to tennis. Emphasis will be on the fundamentals of the basic strokes and strategies in singles and doubles play. Topics will also include selection of equipment, scoring the game, and proper etiquette. 1 credit

PED204 Walking for Fun and Fitness II (ACT) is a continuation of PED 104 and provides the student with advanced techniques for the serious walker. Emphasis is placed on improving distance and time, race walking, prevention of injuries, and motivation techniques. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: PED104.

PED263 Karate II (ACT) expands upon the techniques and philosophies of Karate I. It further develops the art of self-defense. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED162.

PED264 Karate III (ACT) expands upon the techniques and philosophies of Karate II. Students will have the opportunity to advance in rank. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED263.

PED265 Karate IV (ACT) is the advanced phase of karate. It will allow the student to demonstrate the techniques of sparring. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED264.

PED273 Step Aerobics II (ACT) will build on the fundamentals of aerobics. This activity-based course will provide students the opportunity to demonstrate moderate skill level for low impact and high impact aerobics along with principles of body toning. Each student will create an individual fitness plan. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED173.

PED274 Weight Training II (ACT) provides students the opportunity to further develop their Weight Training I programs. The course places an emphasis on increasing exercise intensity, using split routines and fixed and variable progressive systems. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED174.

PED277 Hatha Yoga II (ACT) will expand on students’ current skill level. Students are encouraged to hold poses for longer periods of time, practice new poses and construct routines. Students will demonstrate moderate to advanced yoga poses with acquired flexibility and strength, breath awareness, nutrition awareness, and balance and have opportunities for leadership roles in class. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: PED175.

PED282 Fundamentals of Sports Medicine introduces the theory, practice, and career options in sports medicine. Topics covered will include common athletic injuries, evaluations of major joints (ankle, knee, shoulder), prevention techniques, rehabilitation, taping and other related injuries (heat/cold, illness, concussions, etc). This course will benefit individuals who plan to continue their studies in a sports medicine field, athletic training, and physical therapy. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218.

PED296 Tennis II (ACT) is a physical activity-based course designed to develop intermediate tennis skills with particular emphasis on advanced stroking techniques, physical aspects of playing tennis, practice routines, and the mental aspects of tennis competition. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: PED196.

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Physical Science

PSC105 General Physical Science with Lab (SL) is a survey of systems of measurement, heat, light, sound, the physical states of matter, mechanics, electricity, magnetism, simple chemistry, geology, climate, meteorology, and astronomy. The labs reinforce the principles introduced in lecture and provide an opportunity for personal study of physical phenomena. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL092.

PSC120 Physical Geology (SL) provides an introduction to physical geology, the study of the structure, composition, and surface of the Earth. The geologic history of the Earth's evolution is also covered. Topics include earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, the major types of rocks and minerals, rock strata, weathering, glaciers, plate tectonics, geologic time scales, fossils and dating, and the processes that combine to create the Earth's surface that we see every day. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PSC125 Essentials of Weather (SL) will provide students with a background in essential weather and climatology, with an eye toward dealing with hazardous conditions. Students will learn the concepts necessary to understand the atmosphere, atmospheric circulation, storms, icing, wind shear, turbulence, and other weather hazards. Weather forecast and weather information sources will be utilized. Real time weather data, along with archived data, will be analyzed weekly in the lab. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PSC135 Introduction to Climate Science with Lab (SL) investigates the seasonal and long-term environmental patterns of the earth. The processes that influence the climate can be different from those that determine the weather. Climate, climate variability, climatic change, the influence of human activities, along with the ecological, economic, and societal impacts of climate will be explored and analyzed. Climatic connections with the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and biosphere will be examined. Experiments, model simulations and real-world, climatic data will be used to study the Earth's climate system. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PSC140 Introduction to Ocean Studies with Lab (SL) is a study of the world's oceans focusing on properties and circulation of the ocean, and some interactions between the ocean and components of the Earth system. The human/societal impacts on, and responses to, those interactions will be examined. Physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects of the oceans will be explored. The laboratory exercises are designed to reinforce concepts presented in lecture by having students access and interpret a variety of environmental information, including recent observational data. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PS150 Introduction to Energy and Sustainability with Lab will prepare students to investigate energy, its generation, use and conservation strategies. The dependence of physical and biological processes on energy flow in the Earth's system will be studied. The role of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources to power human activities will be explored. The influence of the economic, political, environmental and social factors on energy decisions will be examined. Field trip experiences may be required. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: EGL093, MAT092 or appropriate skills assessment.

PSC220 Meteorology (SL) the study of the atmosphere, weather elements, air masses, cloud development, atmospheric motion, fronts and storms, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes. Principles of weather forecasting will be discussed. The labs reinforce lecture principles and provide and opportunity for personal study of these phenomena. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT093, EGL093.

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Physical Therapist Assistant

PTA101 Introduction to Physical Therapy Introduction to Physical Therapy provides an introduction and orientation to the field of physical therapy. Course includes historical background, scope of Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) practice, medical-professional ethics and conduct, the role of the physical therapist assistant as part of the health care team, Physical Therapist/Physical Therapist Assistant (PT/PTA) collaboration, documentation, and orientation to psychological and social needs of the ill and disabled.  1 credit
Co-requisites: PTA102, PTA103.

PTA102 Clinical Kinesiology and Biomechanics will present advanced anatomy of the musculoskeletal system with emphasis on joint mechanics, human movement, and palpation of anatomical landmarks.  The student will learn the principles of normal and abnormal posture and gait.  In lab, students will practice the identification and palpation of musculoskeletal structures and identify their related function.  3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218.
Co-requisites: BIO209, BIO219, PTA101, PTA103.

PTA103 Clinical Skills for the PTA is an introduction to the technical and professional skills needed to care for patients in varied settings.  This course introduces documentation and examination of physiological measures, range of motion, strength, and balance. In addition, it covers positioning and draping, body mechanics, and functional activity training. Common diseases and conditions encountered in the field of physical therapy are introduced. In lab, students will practice goniometry, manual muscle testing, vital sign measurement, posture, balance and exertion scales, pain scales, functional mobility training, and documentation. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO208, BIO218.
Co-requisites: BIO209, BIO219, PTA101, PTA102.

PTA204 Therapeutic Modalities provides instruction in the theory and application of therapeutic modalities used by physical therapist assistants. Modalities covered include the therapeutic use of heat and cold, massage, hydrotherapy, traction, intermittent pressure pumps, and use of electrical currents.  Common conditions requiring the use of these treatment modalities will be presented, and contraindications and special precautions for their use will be discussed. In addition, this course will include the appropriate test and measures necessary for the safe application of the modalities utilized by the physical therapist assistant.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: BIO209, BIO219, PTA102, PTA103.
Co-requisites: PTA206, PTA210.

PTA206 Therapeutic Exercise presents the principles of exercise physiology, the concepts and purposes of therapeutic exercise, a variety of exercise treatment strategies, injury prevention and the appropriate tests and measures necessary for the safe application of therapeutic exercise. Common equipment and exercise interventions to improve flexibility, strength, and motor control will be covered. In addition, physiological responses to exercise for specific populations will include patients with chronic illness, children, geriatrics, and pregnancy.  3 credits 
Pre-requisites: BIO209, BIO219, PTA102, PTA103.
Co-requisites: PTA204, PTA210.

PTA210 PTA Seminar I is the first of two seminars addressing the themes of professional issues, core values and the development of an entry level professional candidate.  These seminars will challenge the student to apply professional theme content during patient scenarios as introduced through a variety of case studies.  This first seminar will focus on interpersonal and professional communication, duty, and integrity (ethical, legal, and safe clinical practice), cultural competence, and professional and legal standards for clinical documentation.  2 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA101, PTA102, PTA103.
Co-requisites: PTA204, PTA206.

PTA212 PTA Seminar II is the second of two seminars addressing the themes of professional issues, core values, and the development of an entry level professional candidate. Seminar II will be taken between PTA 232 and PTA 234 and will challenge students to apply professional theme content during patient scenarios as introduced through a variety of case studies. This seminar will cover career development, communication, and continuing professional competence. Activities will include national board exam review preparation, job search strategies, resume development, and professional interview skills.  1 credit
Pre-requisites: PTA210, PTA230, PTA232.
Co-requisite: PTA234.

PTA220 Clinical Orthopedics entails the study of structural anatomy, orthopedic conditions and their underlying pathologies. The student will learn to assess the musculoskeletal and nervous systems as they relate to the orthopedic clinical setting.  Course content will focus on common cervical spine, thoracolumbar spine, upper extremity and lower extremity non-operative diagnoses and post-operative conditions, physical therapy interventions, post-operative and injury care protocols and treatment techniques. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA204, PTA206.
Co-requisites:  PTA222, PTA224, PTA226, PTA230.

PTA222 Clinical Neurosciences focuses on the study of neurological physiology, anatomy, and pathology and an introduction to motor control and motor learning throughout the lifespan. Course content will focus on developing foundational knowledge to work with the neurological pathologies most commonly encountered in the practice of physical therapy.  3 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA204, PTA206.
Co-requisites: PTA220, PTA224, PTA226.

PTA 224 Clinical Cardiopulmonary and Integumentary Issues covers the pathologies associated with peripheral vascular disease, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease and integumentary disorders. Wound care treatments and techniques will be covered in lab. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA204, PTA206.
Co-requisites: PTA220, PTA222, PTA226.

PTA 226 Physical Therapy Special Populations will be presented in 3 distinct units covering the physical therapy interventions and strategies for the following special populations: pediatrics, amputees and women's health clients. 2 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA204, PTA206.
Co-requisites: PTA220, PTA222, PTA224.

PTA 230 Clinical Practice I provides students with supervised application of newly learned skills and reinforcement for previously learned skills in a selected physical therapy setting.  A journal will be required documenting course experience and clinical objectives assigned. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA204, PTA206, PTA210.
Co-requisites: PTA220, PTA222, PTA224, PTA226.

PTA232 Clinical Practice II provides students with supervised application of newly learned skills and reinforcement for previously learned skills in a selected physical therapy setting.  A verbal presentation will be presented to the staff of the host facility as approved by the clinical instructor.  6 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA220, PTA222, PTA224, PTA226, PTA230.
Co-requisites: PTA212, PTA234.

PTA234 Clinical Practice III provides students with supervised application of newly learned skills and reinforcement for previously learned skills in a selected physical therapy setting.  A capstone oral presentation will be presented to the staff of the host facility that differs from that of the Clinical Practice II presentation as approved by the clinical instructor and program ACCE.  6 credits
Pre-requisites: PTA220, PTA222, PTA224, PTA226, PTA230.
Co-requisites: PTA212, PTA232.

Physics

PHY103 Physics Today with Lab (SL) helps students become aware and appreciative of their physical environment. The basic concepts of classical mechanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics are covered. The emphasis is on the relationship between physics and everyday life. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PHY120 Light Science (SL) is an introduction to the science of light. It is intended for students in the visual arts, liberal arts, and those interested in the nature of light. Topics covered include color, vision and the physiology of the eye, optical illusions, cameras, holography, optical recording, symmetry in art and nature, and the properties of light. The emphasis of this course is on the relationship between light, nature, and art using a hands-on, activity-based approach. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT092, EGL093.

PHY181 Introductory College Physics I with Lab (SL) is the first part of a two-semester, algebra-based, physics course. It provides a comprehensive introduction to physics for students interested in physical, biological, health and environmental sciences. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum conservation, collisions, gravitation, fluids, thermodynamics, oscillations, waves, and sound. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem solving and lab experience. Previous exposure to physics principles and strong math skills are highly recommended. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: MAT121.

PHY182 Introductory College Physics II with Lab (SL) is the second part of a two-semester, algebra-based, physics course. Topics include electricity, magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics. Conceptual understanding will be integrated with problem-solving and lab experience. Previous exposure to physics principles and strong math skills are highly recommended. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: PHY181.

PHY207 General Physics I with Lab (SL) is the first course of a three-semester, calculus-based, general physics course sequence. This course provides a comprehensive introduction for students interested in physics and engineering. Topics related to mechanics include linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum conservation, collisions, equilibrium of rigid bodies, and oscillations. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. Previous exposure to physics principles and strong mathematics skills are highly recommended. 5 credits
Co-requisite: MAT201.

PHY208 General Physics II with Lab (SL) is the second course of a three-semester, calculus-based, general physics course sequence. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to students interested in physics and engineering. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and radioactivity. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. 5 credits
Pre-requisite: PHY207.
Co-requisite: MAT202.

PHY209 General Physics III with Lab (SL) is the third course of a three-semester, calculus-based, general physics sequence. Topics from modern physics that will be emphasized include waves, sound, geometrical and physical optics, special relativity, black body radiation, the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, the Bohr model and atomic structure, quantum mechanics, nuclear structure, and semiconductors. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. 5 credits
Pre-requisite: PHY208.
Co-requisite: MAT203.

PHY 217 General Calculus Physics I with Lab (SL) is the first course of a three semester calculus-based general physics course sequence. This course provides a comprehensive introduction for students interested in physics and engineering. Topics related to mechanics include linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, energy and momentum conservation, collisions, equilibrium of rigid bodies, and oscillations. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course. Previous exposure to physics principles and strong mathematics skills are highly recommended.  4 credits
Prerequisite:  MAT121.
Co-requisite:  MAT201.

PHY 218 General Calculus Physics II with Lab (SL) is the second course of a three semester calculus-based general physics course sequence. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to students interested in physics and engineering. Topics include: thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and radioactivity. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course.  4 credits
Prerequisite: PHY217.
Co-requisite: MAT202.

PHY 219 General Calculus Physics III with Lab (SL) is the third course of a three semester calculus-based general physics sequence. Topics from modern physics that will be emphasized: vibrations, waves, sound, geometrical and physical optics, special relativity, black body radiation, the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, the Bohr model and atomic structure, quantum mechanics, nuclear structure and semiconductors. Problem-solving and laboratory skills will be emphasized in this course.  4 credits
Prerequisite:  PHY218.
Co-requisite:  MAT203.

 

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Political Science

POS101 Introduction to Political Science (SS) is a survey course in political science which offers an understanding of the principles, concepts, and dynamics of politics. The course will examine the goals of the government, the different systems of government, the characteristics of political leadership, the relationship between government and citizens, and the relationship among governments. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

POS201 American Government (SS) offers an understanding of how our political system works and how active involvement of the citizenry can make a difference in the responsiveness of our government to the needs of its people. This course provides an overview of the basic government institutions and the processes of American government. The course also examines the relationships between governmental institutions and how the public influences the process. 3 credits
Pre-Requisite: EGL093.

POS202 State and Local Government is a basic course in functions and problems of state and local government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on Maryland jurisdiction with special attention given to Cecil County. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

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Procurement

PRO110 Procurement and Acquisition I is a broad overview of the federal acquisition processes, practices and management. Topics include the federal marketplace, regulations, policies, roles and responsibilities, the federal acquisition process, socioeconomic goals, contract types, fundamentals of contract solicitation, award and administration. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: BUS108.

PRO120 Principles of Pricing covers skills in developing proposals that obtain fair and reasonable prices. Students will examine the competitive and financial environment related to price proposals utilizing the techniques of cost and price analysis, life-cycle costing, return on investment, and cost-benefit analysis.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: MAT093, PRO110.
Notes: Students may enroll for this course with permission of instructor. Contact instructor at dlinthicum@cecil.edu.

PRO121 Legal Issues Government Procurement provides an overview of the procurement process with specific concern for ethical practices and decision making throughout the lifecycle of the procurement process. Legal issues encountered during the procurement process will be discussed as they relate to federal acquisition reform. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PRO110.
Notes: Students may enroll for this course with permission of instructor. After registering, students are to contact instructor at dlinthicum@cecil.edu.

PRO210 Procurement and Acquisition II will provide an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) marketplace. Topics will include defense acquisition planning, market research, competition requirements, defense acquisition of commercial items, proposal preparation and submission, protests, disputes and appeals, terminations, special categories of contracting, and subcontracting. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PRO110.

PRO215 Advanced Procurement and Acquisition builds on the knowledge acquired in previous procurement and acquisition courses. Topics include the Department of Defense's acquisition life cycle phases, milestones and the key activities associated with each, as well as earned value management and acquisition strategies.
3 credits
Pre-requisites: PRO110, PRO210.

PRO220 Pricing and Contract Integration develops skills in pricing, cost analysis, and managing contract issues. Students will develop a proactive, strategic approach to satisfy the customer's evolving requirements.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: PRO120.

PRO230 Procurement Contract Negotiations introduces terminology, methods and techniques necessary to analyze a contractor's cost proposal and to develop a government negotiation objective. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BUS108, PRO110.
Notes: Students may enroll for this course with permission of instructor. After registering, students are to contact instructor at dlinthicum@cecil.edu.

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Psychology

PSY101 Introduction to Psychology (SS) is both the scientific and philosophical study of behavior and thought. Topics covered include methods used to study behavior, perspectives on personality, biological basis of behavior, states of consciousness, human development, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, social psychology, and mental health and adjustment. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

PSY201 Human Growth and Development (SS) studies the developing person through the lifespan, from conception to death. Current research and theories are studied in order to describe and explain physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and personality development in infancy, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and late adulthood. The importance of specific environmental contexts in development, and applications of research and theory are emphasized. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PSY101.

PSY203 Child Growth and Development studies the developing person from conception through adolescence. Current research and applications are used to describe and explain physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and personality development. The importance of specific environmental contexts in development is emphasized. Major topics explored in the course include prenatal development, birth, attachment, language development, abuse and neglect, parenting, moral development, gender role development, and problems and challenges of adolescence. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PSY101.

PSY207 Educational Psychology involves an examination of psychological principles and practices as they apply to educational settings. Several topics related to teaching and learning are addressed, including developmental theory and processes, student characteristics, learning, instruction, diversity, motivation, exceptionalities, effective learning environments, evaluation, and measurement of learning outcomes.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: PSY101.
Co-requisite: EDU207.

PSY222 Organizational Psychology emphasizes the issues of increased productivity, organizational change, and improved organizational environment. Increasingly, managers have turned to the applied behavioral sciences for insights and answers to these compelling problems. The course is designed for students who want to update skills in management, supervising, and/or interpersonal relations. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

PSY227 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology introduces students to theoretical concepts that underlie psychological disorders. The course focuses on presenting the etiology, symptoms, patterns, assessment, treatment, and prevention of abnormal behavior. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: PSY101.

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Russian

RUS101 Russian I (H) introduces the student to the basics of reading, writing, and oral communication in the Russian language. In addition, the student will be introduced to the Russian culture and history. 3 credits

RUS102 Russian II is a continuation of the first semester of Russian. Students will be required to give a presentation to the class on a Russian cultural figure. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: RUS101.

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Social Work

SWK101 Introduction to Social Work (SS) focuses on social work as a profession. The fundamental values, ethics, skills, and knowledge relevant to social work practice will be discussed. Students examine the history, principles, and nature of social welfare, including the relationship of social welfare institutions to society and the delivery systems for social services. Students explore concepts such as human diversity, social and economic justice, the needs of oppressed and disenfranchised populations, and policy in the context of social welfare. The course requires community service activities. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

SWK102 Basic Interviewing Skills is an introduction to the principles and practices of social work interviewing and counseling. Through the use of role-play and simulated interview sessions, students will develop basic interviewing skills for assessment, planning, and intervention. Throughout the exercises, students will evaluate the outcome of the interactions and the progress of the client. Students review personal ethics while developing a counseling orientation appropriate to working with people of various social and economic backgrounds. 3 credits

SWK201 Social Welfare Policy Research and Experience is an introductory course in social work policy research that includes an experiential learning component. The course emphasizes understanding and applying scientific knowledge and research methodologies in providing and evaluating social services.
3 credits
Pre-requisite: SWK101.

SWK202 Elder Care Experiential Learning focuses on student participation in an elder care, agency-based setting under the supervision of an agency designed professional. Students will apply fundamental knowledge, skills, values, and ethics to practice. Students will examine the biological, psychological, and social changes that occur with age and how these changes influence the interactions between the elder person and his or her social environment. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: SWK101.

SWK203 Substance Abuse Experiential Learning focuses on the study of alcohol and drug abuse. Students will participate in a substance abuse facility under the supervision of an agency professional. Students will apply fundamental knowledge, skills, values, and ethics to practice. Students will examine the theoretical perspectives on abuse, pharmacological characteristics of commonly abused substances, and stages of dependence and addiction. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: SWK101.

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Sociology

SOC101 Introduction to Sociology (SS) is the study of human society and social interaction. The course objectives are to understand the basic concepts, origins and theories of sociology; to evaluate the impact of gender and sexual orientation in family life, the workplace and education; to analyze the cultural and social forces which govern human behavior in a diverse society; to describe the positive and negative functions of group conformity; and to apply sociological concepts to everyday life. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

SOC102 Social Problems (SS) is a study of the problems faced by today's society to include causes, ramifications to individuals, and how they might be solved. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

SOC103 Marriage and the Family (SS) is a study of the relationships within the marriage and family experience, including non-traditional relationships. The differences among families and marriages, family structures and functions, changes throughout the family life cycle, and the history of marriage and family will be examined. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL101.

SOC105 Perspectives in Human Diversity (SS) introduces the concepts of diversity consciousness, recognizing and overcoming diversity barriers, and identifying and appreciating cultural differences. Ethical and practical considerations are integrated through the use of case studies, projects, and reaction papers.3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

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Spanish

SPN101 Beginning Spanish I (H) is an introduction to the Spanish language. It presents the fundamentals necessary for understanding, speaking, reading, and writing basic Spanish. Class contents include basic pronunciation and vocabulary, greetings and other social conventions, the concepts of gender and number agreement, and the present tense of all regular and several commonly-used irregular verbs. Class procedure includes practice in conversation, drill in basic grammatical structures, short reading, dialogues, and compositions. Students receive an introduction to Spanish and Latin American culture, history, and geography. 3 credits

SPN102 Spanish II (H) is the second semester of introductory Spanish. It continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills begun in SPN 101. The preterit, imperfect, future, and conditional tenses of regular and irregular verbs and mastery of the phonetically-based spelling changes are begun. The course also covers comparisons and use and placement of object pronouns, and continues vocabulary expansion. Class procedures include lecture, drills, conversation, dialogues, readings, and composition. The study of Spanish and Latin American culture, history, and geography continues, and the use of Spanish in the classroom is encouraged as much as possible. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: SPN101.

SPN111 Spanish Communication Equine in the Equine Industry is a language course for equine professionals who have had little or no Spanish speaking experience, as well as those who are competent in the language but need to enhance their vocabulary. Students will learn practical words, phrases, and Spanish expressions to ease both verbal and written communications in the stable. 3 credits

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Speech

SPH121 Interpersonal Communications (I) is a survey course covering all facets of human communication. The course emphasizes basic communication skills and awareness of what contributes to effective communicating, as well as what contributes to messages miscommunicated. It also provides students with practice in verbal and listening skills. Students relate communication learning to all areas of life and career skills. Classroom discussions, activities, and experiments on a variety of topics are used as a basis for students' growing awareness of perception and skills in communication. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

SPH141 Public Speaking (H) is the study of the principles and models of communication in conjunction with hands-on experience in the planning, structuring, and delivery of speeches. Students study and deliver several kinds of public address. The course also provides students with a model for constructive criticism to teach the students what contributes to effective public speaking. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

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Theatre

THE104 Script Analysis focuses on the analysis and interpretation of play scripts as the foundation for theatrical production. Students will read varied genres of dramatic literature, compile research materials for selected plays, and attend live theatrical performances. Discussion, analysis, and written critique are essential components of this course. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: THE160, THE161 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisites: EGL101, THE108, THE112 or permission of instructor.

THE106 Voice for Actors I provides students with a theoretical and practical foundation in vocal techniques related to speaking on stage as they specifically apply to acting. Students will perform in class and onstage, applying a range of vocal techniques to character studies. 3 credits
Co-requisites: THE111, THE161.

THE108 Movement for Actors is a course which analyzes the basic elements that shape the physical life of a character and how to use them effectively in building a role. Students will develop a heightened awareness of posture and physical patterns; learn basic breathing and movement techniques to support character development; analyze the impact of emotion, sociology, and relationships on a character's physicality; and deepen their understanding of working on stage. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: THE160 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisites: THE104, THE112.

THE110 Theatre Live is a course designed to introduce the student to all aspects of theatrical production and to foster an appreciation for fine art. This goal will be pursued through the attendance and analysis of live theatre productions, both professional and amateur. The attended productions will be the springboard for classroom discussions and reflections papers, focusing on what makes a production a good artistic piece. Attended productions will be preceded with lecture and discussions on various aspects of theatre production to provide the student with background and a clear understanding of the focus of the "field trip." Creative talent from some of the productions will be guests for discussion who will offer special insight into their artistic participation in the production. 3 credits

THE121 Introduction to Theatre Design is a course that will explore the creative process and history behind theatrical design. Emphasis will be placed on the major historical schools of theatrical staging. Assigned playscripts will provide touchstones for explorations of theatrical design, and students will critically evaluate realized theatrical productions. An additional objective of this course is to foster a broader understanding of theatre as a visual art. 3 credits

THE160 Acting I provides students with the essential physical, vocal, and acting techniques that serve as the foundation for performance. Students will be required to perform in class, applying a range of acting techniques, and will participate in oral and written critique and evaluation to demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts presented. 3 credits
Co-requisites: THE111, THE161 or permission of instructor.

THE161 Introduction to Theatre (H) is a survey course of all facets of theatre. Students will be introduced to various theatre professions and experience different aspects of theatre production. An overview of the history of theatre from primitive to modern times, will coincide with play readings/viewings from different genres. Students will work on current Covered Bridge Theatre Company Productions and will attend a professional production. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093 or permission of instructor.

THE164 Applied Theatre I is a study of the skills necessary to create a successful theatre production. Students will employ the skills learned in theatre classes and apply them to a full-length play. Students may contribute to the production as either a performer or as part of the stage crew. This credit may be fulfilled by participating in a theatre department production or, if approved by the theatre faculty, by working with an established company in the region. Students should contact the theatre department to find an appropriate company to work with, and an audition may be required. In addition to scheduled class time, students must be available for rehearsals off campus and are expected to prepare material outside of class. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: THE160.

THE170 Musical Theatre is designed to strengthen students' knowledge of musical theatre as an art form, a popular form of entertainment, and a means for collaborative creativity and communication. The course will focus on the philosophy of this art form in relationship to its historical evolution. The integration of the libretto, lyrics, and music will be examined in terms of their artistic value and combination of music, poetry, and narrative. Through inquiry and analysis, the students will become familiar with the music and plots of many musicals and their significance in the evolution of this art form and reflection of society trends in history. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

THE171 Acting Fundamentals introduces non-majors to the history, theory, and practice of acting. Students will discover differences in acting styles and theories as they have evolved through the centuries. Students will also participate in actor training and assessment activities designed to enhance verbal and non-verbal communication, creativity, critical thinking and presentation skills. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093 or permission of instructor.

THE184 Introduction to Acting for Screen and Stage (H) introduces the art and craft of acting in a variety of contemporary entertainment genres. Auditioning skills, acting for the stage and on-camera, how to write copy, interviewing skills, timing for voiceover, the business of acting are all introduced. Emphasis is placed on creativity, performing for an audience, auditioning and interacting with scene partners. 3 credits
Co-requisite: EGL093.

THE261 Acting II continues the development of the traditional skills and techniques introduced in Acting I. Class work will consist primarily of scenes and monologues from various Modern theatrical genres including Realism, Anti-realism, Comedy and Absurdism. The use of the vocal techniques, physicality and beginning script analysis will be incorporated to further the student’s understanding of the playwrights of Modern Theater, their master works and their use of language in character development. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: THE160 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: THE112 or permission of instructor.

THE262 Theatre History I is an in-depth study of the beginnings of theater in ancient Greece through the Elizabethan era. This course focuses on culture and the development of theatre exploring how each affected the other. Students will read various plays from the Greek, Roman, Medieval, Indian, Chinese, Renaissance, and Elizabethan theatres. Discussion, analysis, group presentation, and written critique are essential components of this course. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: THE160, THE161 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: EGL102 or permission of instructor.

THE263 Directing I explores the varied techniques necessary to transform written drama into a stage performance with a specific point of view. Students will learn the fundamentals of play directing through exercises and projects, and by directing short scenes to synthesize the efforts of the actors, designers, and text into one unified production. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: THE160, THE161 or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: THE212 or permission of instructor.

THE264 Applied Theatre is a study of the skills necessary to create a successful theatre production. Students will employ the skills learned in theatre classes and apply them to a full-length play. Students may contribute to the production as either a performer or as part of the stage crew. This credit may be fulfilled by participating in a theatre department production or, if approved by the theatre faculty, by working with an established company in the region. Students should contact the theatre department to find an appropriate company to work with, and an audition may be required. In addition to scheduled class time, students must be available for rehearsals off campus and are expected to prepare material outside of class.
Pre-requisite: THE160.

THE275 Theatre History II continues the students’ education in the major theatrical movements. Students explore the major social, political and economic conditions of the day and the milestones of theatre in each various time period. A significant achievement in playwriting will be reviewed from each of the studied periods. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: THE262.

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Transportation and Logistics

TRL101 Introduction to Logistics will introduce students to the planning and management of material flows and related information in both public and private sector organizations. This course provides a general overview of the functional areas of supply, maintenance, transportation, and services at each of the tactical, operational, and strategic levels. 3 credits

TRL104 Defense Acquisition Management Overview provides students with an in-depth overview of the federal acquisition process and introduction to the basic concepts, policies and procedures incident to government contracting through the FAR and supplementing directives. This course engages the participant in the entire contracting process. Additionally, this course provides a broad overview of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process, covering all phases of acquisition. This course also introduces the planning, programming, budgeting, and execution process. 3 credits

TRL105 Professional Driver's Knowledge provides theory and instruction for operating commercial vehicles within the USA, Canada and Mexico. After successful completion of this course, a student is eligible to take the Commercial Driver's License Permit Test through the Motor Vehicle Administration. 3 credits
Co-requisite: TRL106.

TRL106 Professional Commercial Driver's Skills provides the on-the-road training and instruction required to operate commercial vehicles within the USA, Canada and Mexico. Students will practice skills necessary for safe and efficient operation of the vehicle on public streets and highways. 6 credits
Co-requisite: TRL105.

TRL107 Supply Chain Management will introduce students to a total systems approach to managing activities involved in physically moving raw materials, inventory and finished goods from the point of origin to point of use or consumption. Topics include product development, manufacturing flow management, procurement, distribution networks, distribution strategies, performance measurement, customer relationship management, customer service management, demand management, order fulfillment, supplier relationship management, and returns management. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: TRL101.

TRL110 Transportation and Warehousing will address the role of the transportation and warehousing functions in the economy and their relationship to the logistics process. Topics will include transportation, public policy, costing, warehouse operations, and materials handling. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: TRL101.

TRL130 Production and Operations Management will provide students with an overview of the translation of product and service requirements into facilities, procedures and operating organizations. Topics include product design, process design, production alternatives, facilities location and layout, resource requirements planning, customer loyalty, and quality control.
Pre-requisite: TRL101.

TRL201 Introduction to Materials Handling introduces the concepts and principles of materials including inventory control and forecasting activities. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: TRL101, TRL110, TRL130.

TRL210 Transportation Management explores the current practices used in the management of commercial transportation departments and their financial and operational impact on manufacturing, marketing, and the other departments in the firm. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: TRL101, TRL110, TRL130.

TRL220 Materials Requirement Planning is a study of materials requirement planning that includes a net change versus regenerative systems, lot-sizing, and time-sharing of dependent demand. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: BUS108, TRL210.

TRL230 Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) will introduce students to the processes of managing the entire lifecycle of a product from its conception, design and manufacture, to its service and disposal; the people, data, and business systems involved; and historical aspects of PLM in Logistics. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: TRL101.

TRL240 Integrated Logistics Management is designed to explore logistics as a cross-functional business process. It cuts across functional boundaries, yet has contributions from each. The principal objective of this course is to take a detailed look at organizations linked within a given supply network and evaluate the role of logistics as an integrator of information flow with material flow. This is the capstone course for the Government Logistics Certificate. 3 credits
Pre-requisites: TRL103, TRL104, TRL210.

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Visual Communications

VCP101 Photography I introduces the art and craft of photography. Students learn digital camera operation, digital scanning, and print production. Emphasis is placed on visual thinking and visual communication. Students complete weekly lab assignments in addition to class activities, to produce a portfolio of fine black and white and color photographs. 4 credits

VCP110 Portrait Photography introduces light techniques for studio and location portraiture along with posing techniques for individual and group shots. Professional software application techniques for post processing and retouching are covered. Business principles and practices for running a portrait studio are introduced. The class includes demonstrations and hands-on activities. In addition to classroom instruction, students reserve three to four hours weekly in the VCP studios and lab to complete the course. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101.

VCP111 Studio Photography I introduces the art and craft of studio photography. Students will use digital cameras for commercial applications. Studio lighting is emphasized for portrait, fashion, and advertising product photography. Students complete weekly studio and lab assignments, in addition to class activities, to produce a studio photography portfolio. Photography business practices are introduced. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101.

VCP114 Special Projects Studio Lab enables advanced visual communications students to initiate or continue a special project. It can also provide additional studio and lab time for students currently enrolled in classes who wish to use the facility beyond the times allocated for the courses they are enrolled in. This course does not fulfill graduation requirements. Permission of the Program Coordinator is required prior to enrolling in the course. 1 credit
Pre-requisite: VCP101 or VCP117 or VCP210.

VCP115 Special Projects Studio Lab enables advanced visual communications students to initiate or continue a special project. It can also provide additional studio and lab time for students currently enrolled in classes who wish to use the facility beyond the times allocated for the courses they are enrolled in. Credits for this course do not fulfill graduation requirements. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101 or VCP117 or VCP210.

VCP116 Digital Imaging I introduces the student to the creation and manipulation of electronic imagery. Students learn to import digital images; scan film, prints, and artwork; create and manipulate images; prepare images for use in Web documents; and make archival inkjet prints with Adobe Photoshop. Visual thinking and communication are emphasized. Students complete weekly lab assignments and produce a final portfolio of printed images, including color correction, colorized black-and-white, restoration, compositing, imagery with text, abstraction, and a personal project. 2 credits

VCP117 Digital Imaging II is a continuation of VCP116. Students learn to make composite artwork by working with masks and layers and to create a Web photo gallery and animated GIFs in Photoshop. Adobe InDesign is introduced along with basic graphic design concepts. Students produce a portfolio of work including the following: a retouched image, a special effects image, a magazine cover, business cards, letterhead, CD disk insert, and five personal project prints. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP116.

VCP118 Digital Imaging III advances the student's graphic design capabilities by using Adobe Illustrator and InDesign, two advanced professional graphic design programs, to combine words and images on the printed page in order to provide real-world skills essential for graphic design careers. Students will create and manipulate images, and combine graphics such as text into page layouts. Students will learn the process of creating professional business cards, brochures, and logos from concept to print. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP117.

VCP119 Digital Imaging IV introduces the student to Web page design. Students use Adobe Photoshop, Dreamweaver, and Flash to conceive and create effective Web sites that are easy to use and that meet the demands of the target market. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP118.

VCP120 Digital Imaging V is an independent study course where students develop and implement a design project. Students meet weekly with the instructor to review progress and receive instruction. In addition to improving existing graphic design skills, students will learn to develop a project proposal and implement that proposal in a successful design project. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP118.

VCP136 Multimedia Production I introduces students to the development of new media design. Students learn different types of multimedia tools and when to use them: QuickTime, Motion, Flash, and DVD Studio Pro. They also gain an understanding of how to create artwork for multimedia productions and when to use one application over another: Illustrator, Photoshop, Image Ready and AfterEffects. Students may use any additional tools at their disposal: Final Cut Pro and Apple Cinema Tools. Traditional art skills are emphasized: knowledge of typography, design, user interface, layout, composition, form, color, and overall visual communication and thinking. Students learn the process and methodologies of multimedia development while completing weekly assignments and a final project. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP117.

VCP140 Wedding Photography Portfolio Production introduces the wedding photography business and engages students in the production of wedding photographs and marketing materials for a professional portfolio. Topics include available light portraiture, location lighting using studio lights, on-camera flash and slave lighting and posing individuals, couples, and large groups. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101 or consent of instructor.

VCP144 Web-Design I-Design Fundamentals provides an overview of the major design considerations for well-balanced web site construction to include the planning cycle, web technologies, usability, site structure, and navigation styles. Emphasis is placed on design issues as each category is explored using HTML and CSS. Students will plan, design, and publish a home page and two lower-level pages of a web site. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL093.

VCP151 Introduction to Game Design provides an introduction to computer game development, starting from concept development to implementation of a playable game prototype. Aesthetic and technical aspects of computer game development are covered, including game mechanics, story development, content creation, and game programming. 4 credits.
Pre-requisite: DAP119 or VCP218.

VCP162 Introduction to Mobile Application Development will introduce mobile application development from concept development to implementation of a mobile application. Visual and programmatic aspects of mobile development, including computer programming, mobile design, and user interaction are covered.
4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP117.

VCP170 Photography Seminar-Equine is a one-day seminar for learning what elements make a good horse photograph and how to achieve them. Instructor will show photos from the Olympics and other equestrian events as examples. Conditions permitting, students will participate in photographing horses at an equestrian event or on a farm. Students should bring cameras. Students may bring previous horse photos for constructive discussion. 1/2 credit

VCP180 Applied Printing Techniques is the study of the fundamentals of black and white and color photography and digital printing. 1 credit
Co-requisite: ART180.

VCP189 Basic Internship I is a supervised experience with a visual communications employer for 15 days/120 hours. In addition, the student has weekly conferences with the visual communications coordinator. The student should apply for the internship with the visual communications coordinator before the semester begins, and complete an internship proposal before registering for the course. The student will complete an internship notebook and portfolio. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101 or VCP117.

VCP210 Video Production I introduces students to the techniques of video production. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving scenarios and hands-on experience. Several short video programs are directed and produced. Students have the opportunity to work on an individual basis as well as in teams. 4 credits

VCP211 Studio Photography II continues the study of the art and craft of commercial photography. Students use digital cameras, digital processing, and electronic and print output for commercial applications. Studio lighting is emphasized for portrait, fashion, and advertising product photography. Students complete weekly studio and lab assignments, in addition to class activities, to produce a commercial photography portfolio.
4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP111.

VCP212 Video Production II expands to the techniques of video production. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving scenarios and hands-on experience. Several short video programs are directed and produced. Students work on an individual basis as well as in teams. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP210.

VCP214 Video Production III provides the opportunity for the advanced visual communications student to concentrate on building a demo reel in an individual area of interest to further career and course goals.
4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP210.

VCP215 Guerilla Filmmaking introduces the techniques of HD digital short filmmaking with in-depth attention to traditional film lighting and sophisticated location shooting. Emphasis is placed on "hands-on" experiences and the coordination of all production elements including concept development, scriptwriting, production, and post-production. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP210.

VCP216 Guerilla Filmmaking II advances the techniques of HD digital filmmaking with in-depth attention to traditional film lighting and sophisticated location shooting. Emphasis is placed on artistic short films, "hands-on" activities, and the coordination of all production elements including concept development, scriptwriting, production, and post-production. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP215.

VCP218 Modeling and Animation I focuses on the tools needed to create and animate 3D models at both the technical and artistic level. Students will be introduced to designing and producing 3D models using polygon, spline, and mesh editing. Other techniques introduced are texturing, lighting, and animation for object and global 3D environments. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: CSC119 or VCP210, or permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: VCP116, VCP117, or permission of instructor.

VCP222 Photojournalism I studies the approaches and techniques of photographic reportage. Topics include news, features, issue reporting, journalistic portraits, sports, photo essay, documentary photography, and ethics and law. Emphasis is placed on visual interpretation and communication, composition, and photo editing. Students complete weekly shooting and lab assignments, participate in class discussions and critiques, create a picture story layout, plan and photograph a group project, and produce a strong photojournalism portfolio. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101.

VCP223 Photojournalism II develops advanced technical proficiency, personal approach, and a strong photojournalism portfolio. Topics include general news coverage, journalistic portraits, a food feature, an architecture/interior feature, nature, sports, photo essays, editing, layout, and selling work to publications. Writing captions and short text is also emphasized. Students complete weekly shooting and lab work and participate in class critiques. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP222.

VCP224 Nature and Wildlife Photography introduces the student to the fundamentals of professional nature and wildlife photography: equipment, processes, aesthetics, portfolio preparation, and marketing. The course includes extensive field trips to photograph with the instructor. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101.

VCP227 Advanced Digital Imaging Production II prepares students to create custom solutions for real commercial world production assignments using Photoshop. Advanced editing and image capture techniques are covered. Students work in teams with art directors and production staff to simulate real-world commercial environments. 2 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP226.

VCP230 Graphic Design Studio implements design and production skills learned in prerequisite courses to create an integrated, singular portfolio of product design, page layout, and marketing collateral. This class prepares students for the workplace by teaching practical application and focusing on a real-world project that requires real-world solutions. Students will design, and produce all materials based on an overview of real-world marketplace expectations. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP119.

VCP233 Fictional Photography introduces and advances students through the convergence of visual, cinematic storytelling, combined with the impact of still photography. This course is centered on location-based strobe lighting, conceptual thinking, pre-visualization, location scouting, directing actors and assistants, and advanced post-production techniques. 4 credits
Pre-requisites: VCP111, VCP116.

VCP234 Nature and Wildlife Photography II advances the student’s understanding of the fundamentals of professional nature and wildlife photography: equipment, processes, aesthetics, portfolio preparation and marketing. The course includes extensive, instructor-led photography field trips. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP224.

VCP244 Web Design II - Advanced Design builds on the design process covered in Design I—Design Fundamentals. This course covers advanced web technologies that make web sites interactive and dynamic to include multimedia, forms, CSS, XML, client-side programming technologies, and server-side programming technologies. Other advanced design considerations covered include how to design for disability access, maintenance, navigational aids, and search engine optimization. 3 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP144.

VCP270 Portfolio Production I provides an opportunity for advanced visual communications students to concentrate on building portfolios in individual areas of interest to further their career and personal goals. Students complete weekly lab assignments, in addition to class activities, to produce a portfolio. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: VCP101.

VCP279 Professional Portfolio Production enables the visual communications major to prepare a capstone portfolio of imagery and written documentation suitable for presentation to meet graduation portfolio requirements, and for application to a transfer institution and/or for career advancement. Emphasis is placed on visual thinking and visual communication. Students complete weekly lab assignments, in addition to class activities, to produce a professional portfolio and a capstone presentation to the college community. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: 19 VCP credits.

VCP289 Internship I is a supervised experience with a visual communications employer for 15 days/120 hours. In addition, the student has weekly conferences with the visual communications director. The student should apply for the internship with the visual communications director at least six weeks before the semester begins, and complete an internship proposal before registering for the course. Students complete an internship notebook and present a capstone portfolio. 4 credits
Pre-requisite: EGL101.

VCP296 Photography Seminar provides the opportunity for experienced photographers to advance their skills in digital image making and manipulation under the guidance of an expert in the field. Creativity and problem-solving are stressed. Students complete weekly studio and lab assignments, in addition to class activities, to produce a commercial photography portfolio. 4 credits

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